Happy Thanksgiving! (And also, you have some work to do. Sorry.)

Congratulations, guys– you made it to Thanksgiving.  Take some time over the next week to relax, enjoy time with your family and friends, and eat some pies.

However.

We’re getting awfully close to the end of the semester (only three more weeks when we get back!), which means you’ve got some work to complete over the break.  So here’s what you need to do during your break:

  1. Complete the CCOT Worksheet using the prompt from the 2015 AP World History exam.  (For those of you who were absent on Friday, please check your email– I’ll send it to you.  You should also review how to write a Change and Continuity essay by looking at the Essay Writing Materials section of this website.)
  2. Read, annotate, and grade one of the three released student sample essays from the 2015 CCOT essay.  (Again, those of you who were absent, please check your email.)  We’ll talk about how you graded the essays when we get back on Monday, November 30th.
  3. Read for this unit! (Basically: finish the book.  Your reading quiz will be on December 3rd.)
  4. Work on your Content Paper.  It’s due on December 1st.
  5. Start working on the Student Learning Objective Review.  Remember, your Student Learning Objective (SLO) exam will make up 10% of your final grade, and will take place on December 11th.

So that’s what you need to be up to date for the next week.  Take care, have fun, and I’ll see you on the 30th.

 

(And just a reminder– I’m going to be out in the hinterlands starting on Sunday, so I make no guarantees about my availability via email.  If you need to get in contact with me for any reason, I may not respond until Saturday, November 28th.)

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Homework: Imperialism, the Opium Wars, and China

Thanks so much for your thoughtful participation in our discussion on terror, extremism, and the events in Beirut and Paris today, guys– I know that it took us a bit off-book, but I do think that it’s important to give you guys a space for discussion and analysis when we have events like this.  If you’re interested, I’ll link to the full articles we read today at the bottom of this entry.  And if you’d like to add your own resources, feel free to drop relevant links in the comments for this entry.  I certainly don’t mind if you continue our discussion from today in the comments on this blog– just remember to keep it civil, keep it rational, and post thoughtfully.

Now.  On to the meat of the issue: since we went off-book today,  I need to ask you to cover some content so that we’ll still be on pace for the unit.  I’ll be doing some reconfiguring of my lesson plans tonight, too, so if you’ll do this for me, I’ll do the heavy  lifting tomorrow and Wednesday.

Tonight, please download the following chart (Imperialism in East Asia Cause and Effect Chart), and then use the Imperialism, Opium, and China PowerPoint and your textbook to complete the chart.  We’ll discuss it tomorrow at the start of class, before jumping into a discussion of nationalism (which actually connect rather well to some of the things you read about today, honestly).

Also, remember that your Content Paper is due December 1st, so keep that in the back of your minds.


 

Materials from today’s discussion:

If you have other materials you would like to add to this list, please feel free to link to them in the comments below.

 

Homework: Zaption on Asian Responses to Imperialism

Sorry about posting this late, guys– I got distracted by the news out of Paris, sadly, and totally forgot I hadn’t put your Zaption assignment up on the blog yet.

Remember, you’ll need to read the document I handed out in class today, analyze it carefully, and answer the associated questions on a separate sheet of paper.  Then, please watch the Crash Course episode on Asian Responses to Imperialism included in the Zaption below:

Zaption: Asian Responses to Imperialism 

If you run into difficulties watching the Zaption, please check your browser– Zaption works best on Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.  It can work on Internet Explorer, so long as it is the most recent version– and the same goes for Safari.  If your browser hasn’t been updated in a while, start there– download a newer version of your browser, clear your cookies, and try again.

See you on Monday, guys.

Homework: Urbanization Game Redux

So today in class we played the Urbanization Game, which hopefully allowed you to see just how incredibly chaotic and rapid the pace of change was during the 18th and 19th centuries.  If your city was anything like most other groups’ cities, it was cramped, poorly-planned, and probably a really dangerous and unpleasant place to live.  And that really isn’t an unfair categorization of most cities during this era: most were deeply unpleasant places to live, especially if you were part of the working class.

Therefore, your homework tonight is to reflect on the city you built in class today, its problems, and what you might be able to do in order to improve things.  To that end, you will take a sheet of paper (notebook paper is fine, but if you want to make yours pretty, that’s fine) and design a better industrial city.  The city you draw must contain the following:

  • 1 river
  • at least 50 trees
  • 70 houses
  • 50 tenements
  • 15 estates
  • at least 15 stores
  • at least 5 churches
  • 12 public houses (pubs)
  • at least 5 hospitals
  • 25 factories (with smoke)
  • 5 coal mines
  • 7 schools
  • 2 cemeteries
  • 2 jails
  • 1 theater
  • 1 music hall
  • 1 museum

You may draw in as many roads, bridges, railroads, and canals as you see fit.  Additionally, you might consider adding in municipal parks– green space for public use and enjoyment was a new idea in the 19th century, and the first public park will be designed in Liverpool, England in 1843.  Your goal is to design a city which would work– a place that is safe, pleasant, efficient, productive, and attractive.

When you have finished designing your new and improved city, please answer the following questions on a sheet of paper:

  1. How would you describe the city your group created in class?  What were some of the biggest problems you noticed about your first city?
  2. How is your new city design different from what you designed in class?  Describe how it is organized.  Why did you choose this design?  Do you think this sort of city design would work in real life?  Why or why not?

Don’t forget– you’ll be writing me another in-class DBQ during the first part of class tomorrow, so it might be a good idea to look over your notes on how to write one tonight.

19th Century Migrations: Classwork for November 10th

Hello, lovely students!  I hope everything went smoothly today with your substitute– remember, all of your work is due at the start of class tomorrow.  If, for some unknown reason, you didn’t finish gathering all of the material you needed from the signs up around the room, please check the file located below.

Nineteenth Century Migration Placards

That should be all you need to finish your work.  Also, remember that your Unit Five Vocabulary is due at the start of class tomorrow, and we’ll begin class with your Unit Five reading quiz.

See you soon!

Have you registered for your AP exams yet?

It’s that time of year again– time to register for your AP exams!  Here at North Cobb, we do all of our registration for AP exams online, so you won’t be bringing any money or checks to school– everything will be done online.  In order to register, please do the following:

  1. Go to the North Cobb TotalRegistration.Net site.
  2. Create an account using an email address that you will check frequently.  They’re going to send you important stuff regarding your registration, so you DO NOT want it sitting in an account you don’t check, or going into your spam filter.  You might even want your parents to create the account so that all the important payment stuff goes to them.
  3. Select which exams you plan on taking in May.  (Hint: you plan on taking the AP World History exam– because you’re taking this class right now and you’ve been working your butt off and you know this stuff— and whatever AP class(es) you’re registered for next semester.  The deadline for registration is Thursday, January 28th, so you won’t have long to sign up after Winter Break. Go ahead and do it now.
  4. Be sure to indicate which teacher you have for the AP class (if you know– you might not, if you’re taking the class next semester).  This is important, because it lets individual teachers see how their students did on the exam.
  5. Select your payment options.  You will need to pay online with a debit or credit card, or you can set it up so that you can pay in installments via check or credit card.  Each exam will cost $92.00, so you need to start thinking about costs now.

***SUPER IMPORTANT INFORMATION: If you are eligible for free or reduced lunch, you can get a significant discount on your AP exams.  All you need to do is click on the free and reduced option on the payment page on TotalRegistration.Net, pick up a form from me or Ms. Epps in Admin 1, take it home, have your parent or guardian sign it, and then return it to Ms. Epps.  She’ll verify your paperwork, and you’ll be able to get the bulk of your exam costs covered!

If you have any questions about the registration process, or want to talk about how to prepare for the AP World History exam, or anything else– please feel free to come and talk to me as soon as possible.  Remember, with a score of 3 or higher you can qualify for college credit, depending on the course and university you attend.  That means that a $92 investment can save you hundreds of dollars in tuition and books, and– if you qualify for enough coursework hours– may mean you can graduate early (saving EVEN MORE $$$), or that you can add additional majors, certificates, or minors to your undergraduate career and still graduate on time.

For further information on AP exams, please see the College Board’s site on this topic.

Latin American Revolutions Homework and Due Dates!

All right, guys– I know it’s been nothin’ but revolutions this week, but you’ve got one more.  Or rather, a series of revolutions.  What you need to do is get out your Latin American Revolution handout from class (or download another copy here: The Age of Revolutions in Latin America), and complete it using the Crash Course video located below, your textbooks, and the notes from this PowerPoint: Latin American Revolutions.


Now, on to due dates.  Big dates coming up that you should keep track of:

  • Annotated Bibliography (Monday, November 9th)
  • Unit Five Reading Quiz (Wednesday, November 11th)
  • Unit Five Vocabulary Assignment (Wednesday, November 11th)
  • In-Class DBQ (Thursday, November 12th)
  • Second Film Review (Friday, November 13th)
  • Industrial Revolution WebQuest Due (Thursday, November 19th)
  • Unit Five Test (Thursday, November 19th)

Additionally, remember that we’ll be in the Media Center tomorrow for a WebQuest, and I’ll be absent on Tuesday of next week for Model UN.  (You’ll have a lot of work in my absence, so try not to get too excited.)  Also, I’ll be teaching you how to write the third and final type of essay for this course on the 20th, so if you know you’re going to be absent that day in advance of Thanksgiving break, please let me know so that we can make arrangements.