Homework: The Holocaust

This weekend, please review the following material on the Holocaust (or Shoah) as a continuation of our study of World War II:

World War II and Society

After reviewing the material above, please listen to the following radio broadcast by journalist Edward R. Murrow on the liberation of Buchenwald in April of 1945.  You will find that the sound quality is far from perfect– there are lots of hisses and pops and the whine of interference, as this is the actual recording from 1945.  If you would like to, you can follow this transcript of the broadcast while you listen– but please do listen.  Sometimes the tone of voice is just as important as the words themselves:

Liberation of Buchenwald, 15 April 1945, reported by Edward R. Murrow (CBS News)

In a thoughtful comment, please respond to the following prompts:

  1. Describe the events in Germany beginning in 1933 which led to the Final Solution.  What was their purpose?  How did these actions normalize discrimination?

  2. What were the conditions like in Buchenwald when Murrow and the American troops arrive?  What sort of men did Murrow encounter in the camp?  What do you think shocked Murrow the most about the experience?  What shocked you the most about his description?

  3. At the end of the broadcast, Murrow tells his audience that “if [he] has offended [them] by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, [he’s] not in the least bit sorry.”  What is Murrow’s tone when he delivers this line?  (That is, how does he sound?)

  4. Murrow, as a journalist, believed that it was his job to make an argument– NOT to be a mere reporter of facts.  What argument is he trying to make through this report?  What does he want his listeners to feel, learn, and believe as a result of his work?  Do you think that he achieved his goal?  Why or why not?

Remember, normal commenting rules apply: one thoughtful comment which addresses all of the discussion points thoroughly will receive up to 95%,  while you must comment and leave a response on someone else’s comment in order to earn full credit.

Try to get some rest this weekend, guys– we’ve got the final push coming up over the next two weeks.  Remember you have your Unit Six test on Thursday (12/10), and your Student Learning Objective exam on Friday (12/11), so let’s get ready to power through.

 

 

87 thoughts on “Homework: The Holocaust

  1. Since the Germans were in such poor shape in the aftermath of WWI, they were looking for someone to blame for their great misfortune. So when Hitler began his rise to power, he was able to easily to place the blame on the Jews so that all the Germans would have a common enemy that could bring them together to revive the “German Empire”.

    When Murrow arrived at Buchenwald, he was mostly seeing the last stand and immediate aftermath of the Holocaust since he describes naked, starving, dying people. He seemed most s hocked about how the Nazi troops were “smiling with their eyes” and frankly, that also made a chill run down my spine.

    When Murrow “apologizes” about the graphic report, he sounds like he doesn’t care that your stomach is turning inside out, rather he has completed his duty as a reporter to bring you the cold and hard truth.

    In addition to dishing out the facts, Murrow also makes an argument of how we can’t simply ignore the fact that millions have died and this should be a reminder that the world is not always what it seems. His delivery was well executed, he wasn’t too direct but also kept us listeners focused on the issue at hand.

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    • I agree with Murrow’s execution, I only wish he had more detail about the prisoners. He should have done more interviews with the prisoners to help show the audience how the prisoners feel in the camps.

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      • I also agree because if he did interview the prisoner themselves; it allowed the listeners of the broadcast would be able to have a stronger support also a stronger sense of remorse.

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  2. When the Nazis had risen to power in 1933 the Holocaust was instituted, which was the state-sponsored persecution of groups that were said to be “inferior or dangerous to the stability of the Nazi regime. Events such as the anti-Semitic Nuremberg laws being passed and the responses to a Jewish teenager assassinating a German diplomat. This prompted the Germans to move the Jews into ghettos; which were concentrated with majorities of the Jewish population, along with transporting them to concentration camps. The idea to annihilate the Jewish population by sending the to extermination camps was or “final solution” was introduced following these events, which seemed to all be steps to a systematic extermination of Jews of a whole (genocide). These actions normalized discrimination because even though what was going on in concentration camps was hidden for some time to the public, in the eyes of the Nazi followers didn’t see a problem with it being so that this persecution was lead by people they saw as great leaders. The people of Germany ultimately saw this as a way to unify the state. The conditions in Buchenwald as described by Murrow were horrid. Several times he states that he couldn’t mention some of the things that he had seen. While there he encountered many different people from different backgrounds in Buchenwald, such as doctors and professors. I think what shocked Murrow the most about the camp was having to see the faces of the many people that could drop dead any day, he even describes a man dropping dead right in front of him. The things that shocked me most about the description is the amount of food these people were receiving on a daily basis and how their bodies were being handled with no respect after death. His tone at the end of his broadcast when saying that he won’t apologize if any of his reports offends or disturbs anyone is angry yet still passionate. I believe Murrow was trying to make the argument that we needed to know the extent to which these persecutions were carried out. He wanted people to know through his broadcast the brutality of this situation. I think he successfully does this because as a student who has learned about the Holocaust for several years now I feel as if this broadcast has gave me a new and better understanding of what actually happened.

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    • I agree that he wanted to show the brutality of the situation because he wanted his listeners to understand what was going on at Buchenwald. He wanted them to know what the Nazis were doing to mostly innocent people including the children.

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  3. Nazi’s rising to power in Germany is what led to the Final Solution. Many of the victims of the Holocaust were Jewish, but there were also homosexuals, communists, Africans, Slavic people, socialists,and disabled people. The victims of the Holocaust were basically people who Hitler saw as inadequate people, so he easily placed blame on them for World War One and “removed” them from society by placing them in concentration camps. Many though it was beneficial to place them in these camps because Hitler made it seem like they caused they war and were simply being punished for it.

    The conditions in Buchenwald were extremely atrocious. There were 1200 men in a stable meant for 80 horses and there was a pungent odor in their living spaces. He discovered people he had previously known but had not recognized due to the harsh conditions of the camp. He described them as the “living dead” because they were about as good as dead as they were in that camp. What shocked him the most about it was that many people did not know the conditions of the camps and that some villages in Germany had not looked like they had gone through war and were well-fed and clothed while Murrow reports seeing only two clothed men in the courtyard of many. What shocked me was knowing that many people thought that the people in the camps deserved what they were going through without fully knowing the conditions of the camp.

    Murrow sounded disgusted when he delivers that line. He sounded disgusted in that many people were unaware of the conditions. He sounded disgusted that people would force other people to go through those conditions. He also sounded dignified that he could share the accounts and confess the atrocities of the concentration camps that killed nearly 11 million people.

    His argument includes that people don’t deserve the cruelty of the Final Solution and that the conditions of the camp were worse than many expected. He wanted his listeners to learn the full truth about the concentration camps that took the lives of many Jews who did nothing to deserve it. He wanted the listeners to feel remorse for the people that went through the conditions of the camp simply because of the way they were born or what they believed in. I think that anyone who hears the broadcast or reads the transcript would discover the truth and feel remorse because of how he delivers the information. He lets it be known who was in fault for this without even saying it.

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    • I agree that he wanted listeners to know he full truth about concentration camps. He wanted people to know that the Jews were innocent people and hadn’t done anything at all to deserve this, and that everyone should do everything in their power to prevent it from happening again.

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  4. Germany was struggling with economic and political problems after WWI. After the Treaty of Versailles, the Big Four placed mostly if not all the blame on Germany for WWI. This caused Germany’s territories to decrease and they had to owe countries billions of dollars in reparations, which they didn’t have. So this lead to the rise in Nazism in Germany. They started to blame Jews for Germany’s loss in WWI and economic problems as a scapegoat. This lead to series of ways to eliminate several million Jews. In 1935, Germany created anti-Semitic laws that are similar to how the Mongols separated ethnic Chinese from the Mongols. For example; Jews were not allowed to marry non-Jews. After this they created Kristallnacht, which destroyed synagogues and Jewish homes and caused thousands of Jews to flee to America. And this created ghettos to separate Jews from Germans and concentration camps to hold Jews as well. The final solution was extermination camps to kill all Jews and this caused to accept that this type of discrimination was normal.
    The conditions in Buchenwald were awful as described by Murrow. The stench was unbearable and even indescribable. Throughout the camp he saw people close to death and people starving so badly he could see their ribs through their shirt. He encountered Czechoslovakians, Jews, many politicians, and professors as well. What shocked Murrow the most was probably how many deaths occurred in the camp and how many more that continued to happened and also how the people looked as though they were borderline dead people walking around the camp. What shocked me was that how normal the Germans are about this. The doctor shrugged when Murrow asked how people died in the camps and he just said “tuberculosis, starvation, fatigue…It is very difficult.”
    When Murrow says he’s not the even sorry, his tone sounds as though everyone listening should care about what is happening in these camps and its his job to tell facts and that the truth hurts.
    An argument he is trying to make in this report is that these extermination camps are god awful and that these need to be stopped. His report is trying to show how inhumane the treatment of ordinary people are in these camps. He wants his listeners to learn about how these camps are mass killing the lives of innocent people and how the treatment should be stopped immediately. I feel as though he achieved this goal, because he delivered facts that should cause people’s stomachs to churn and feel awful for the people in those camps.

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    • I agree. The way he delivers that statement and how he shows no remorse for telling the truth displays that he is a reporter trying to get his point across and draw others closer to his views.

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    • I agree with what you said about the Germans indifference. They seemed like it was just a day at work and even bragged about how “efficient” they are. It is insane to think someone could be that careless regarding human life.

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  5. Since the end of World War I, Germany’s economy was in incredibly bad shape. Additionally, its reputation was badly damaged. When Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party came to power in 1933, they spread the idea that Jewish people and other “opponents” were responsible for these problems. These ideas eventually led to actions against these “opponents”, such as Nuremburg Laws in 1935. These laws allowed people to legally discriminate against the targeted groups, thereby normalizing it and making people think it was okay. This eventually led to increased discrimination and violence such as that seen on Kristallnacht in 1938.
    When the Americans and Murrow arrive in Buchenwald, they are shocked at the appalling conditions of the people living there. Murrow meets men who he says look like “death has marked them”, meaning they looked incredibly sick, emaciated, or a combination of the two. Many of these men were once well respected members of their communities. I think that Murrow was most shocked by the difference between the deplorable conditions within the camp versus the good condition of people just a small distance away from the camp. He was also probably shocked by just how bad the conditions were because many people did not realize just how bad the concentration camps were before the allies went in and liberated them. The thing that shocked me most about Murrow’s description is the fact that this radio broadcast was not the worst of the horrors that occurred. Murrow mentions multiple times that he is leaving out information in order to spare his listeners and he also mentions how some of the prisoners said that Buchenwald is the best camp to be at.
    When Murrow delivers this line, he sounds very serious, almost angry and he puts stress on the word mild. I think that he is trying to get across that what was reported was not the worst of the atrocities that people were experiencing and he is trying to make his audience understand that is important to know what went on and not to ignore it just because it did not happen to them or to their country.
    Murrow is trying to make people see just how horrifying the conditions were at these concentration camps and to make sure they do not ignore them. He wants people to understand that they should care about what happened to make sure that it does not happen again. Murrow is trying to tell his viewers that although they should be happy that the war is over, they should remember the people who had to go through this terrible ordeal. I think that he did achieve his goal because he presented people with the evils that occurred and showed they were so bad that anyone who listened to the broadcast could not ignore them.

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  6. Since the end of World War I, Germany’s economy was in incredibly bad shape. Additionally, its reputation was badly damaged. When Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party came to power in 1933, they spread the idea that Jewish people and other “opponents” were responsible for these problems. These ideas eventually led to actions against these “opponents”, such as Nuremburg Laws in 1935. These laws allowed people to legally discriminate against the targeted groups, thereby normalizing it and making people think it was okay. This eventually led to increased discrimination and violence such as that seen on Kristallnacht in 1938.
    When the Americans and Murrow arrive in Buchenwald, they are shocked at the appalling conditions of the people living there. Murrow meets men who he says look like “death has marked them”, meaning they looked incredibly sick, emaciated, or a combination of the two. Many of these men were once well respected members of their communities. I think that Murrow was most shocked by the difference between the deplorable conditions within the camp versus the good condition of people just a small distance away from the camp. He was also probably shocked by just how bad the conditions were because many people did not realize just how bad the concentration camps were before the allies went in and liberated them. The thing that shocked me most about Murrow’s description is the fact that this radio broadcast was not the worst of the horrors that occurred. Murrow mentions multiple times that he is leaving out information in order to spare his listeners and he also mentions how some of the prisoners said that Buchenwald is the best camp to be at.
    When Murrow delivers this line, he sounds very serious, almost angry and he puts stress on the word mild. I think that he is trying to get across that what was reported was not the worst of the atrocities that people were experiencing and he is trying to make his audience understand that is important to know what went on and not to ignore it just because it did not happen to them or to their country.
    Murrow is trying to make people see just how horrifying the conditions were at these concentration camps and to make sure they do not ignore them. He wants people to understand that they should care about what happened to make sure that it does not happen again. Murrow is trying to tell his viewers that although they should be happy that the war is over, they should remember the people who had to go through this terrible ordeal. I think that he did achieve his goal because he presented people with the evils that occurred and showed they were so bad that anyone who heard the broadcast could not ignore them.

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    • I agree, that Murrow’s message to the audience is mainly to prevent anymore deaths from concentration camps and to show others without knowledge on the topic the horrifying conditions at Buchenwald . I like your approach on Murrow’s feeling toward the topic and I feel that through his report and experience from Buchenwald, he has informed millions about the conditions and deaths of innocent people in German concentration camps.

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  7. Since WWI, the economy of Germany was very poor as a result of the Treaty of Versailles saying they had to pay Britain and France war debts. Germany also became a place not to be trusted by many countries. When Hitler and the Nazis came to power in 1933, they blamed the Jewish people and other groups of people, such as homosexuals, for Germany’s problems. Most people followed these ideas because Germany was in such a bad state. These ideas led to anti-Semitic laws known as the Nuremberg laws, which allowed people to legally discriminate against these people. These laws made the act of discrimination normal, which eventually led to the idea of increased discrimination and violence.
    The conditions in Buchenwald were beyond terrible; the people had little living areas, little food rations, poorly made clothing, and unsanitary living conditions to say the least. Murrow encountered many doctors, politicians, and other honorable and smart men. He even encountered a communist. I think what shocked Murrow most is the amount of death that had resulted from the living conditions, not even by murder. What shocked me the most was how many of the people seemed to have remembered their past and the things that have happened to them after all of the torture they had been through.
    When Murrow says this, he sounds frustrated, especially when he says the word mild. I think he sounds like this because he believes that the story of Buchenwald should be told to the full extent, not as a mild account to hide any gruesome details.
    I think the argument he is trying to make is that, regardless of being our country’s history or not, and regardless of how depressing the story is, we must learn from it to prevent it from happening in the future. He wants listeners to feel angry and horrified at the facts he is giving them, so that the people do everything in their power to prevent it from happening again in the future. I think he did achieve this goal because everyone knows of the terrors the Germans did in the camps. I also think the fact of him stressing that his descriptions hadn’t even come close to the actual event helped get his message across, because it made listeners feel the true horrors of the camps.

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    • I agree that Murrow’s main point or argument is to prevent this from happening again in the future. His view on the camps makes it seem as if people don’t do anything about it, the problem will spread, rapidly.

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    • I did not think of that myself about Murrow’s argument, but that is certainly a good point to bring up about his argument. I think talking about the Holocaust in general is all to really deter people from ever supporting such atrocities again.

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  8. Many events throughout the 1930’s allowed,excused, and eased non-Jewish German people into the Final Solution. For example, in 1935 a series of laws passed in Germany called the Nuremberg Laws were passed, its purpose was to make it legal to racially discriminate against Jews and make sure there was no breeding between Jews and Germans. This made the discrimination against Jews legal, by putting this into law the Final Solution was also seen as legal people were just obeying the law of the land.The Kristallnacht pogroms of 1938, allowed the mass execution of Jews, this provided a segway and almost a trial run for the Final Solution that would soon come. Other events, were the removal to ghettos in 1939 and creation of concentration camps, these processes annexed Jews and made the Final Solution easier to complete.
    Upon Murrow arriving in Buchenwald, he sees the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust including the overcrowded, starved, dying people of it as well as stenches throughout the whole tour. What shocked Murrow most to me was the amount of deaths,children, and the amount of men that had high ranking, useful jobs in the camp. There were many doctors, professors, and political leaders in the camps. What shocked me most was the stenches,how there were criminals intertwined with the innocent Jews, and the fact that people could’ve just came to Germany at the wrong time and be sucked into the Holocaust.
    Murrow’s comment on not caring about offending people has a very hostile and indignant tone. His argument was for everyone not to turn a blind eye to all of the deaths or be too scared to hear about it, instead his argument is to make it an example of what is to never happen again in history. I think he was very effective in delivering his argument because he didn’t empathize, instead he gave the truth through his account and wasn’t censoring it to make it more appealing to the public, he gave me what was real. His broadcast open my eyes more to the aftermath of the Holocaust and its lasting effect on the world.

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    • I agree, I think that he was angry that people weren’t telling the whole truth. He wanted people to know what was really going on so that people would understand that what happened was truly appalling.

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    • I agree that he did not empathize, he gave the truth. If he would have censored it then his argument would’ve been less effective because it would not expose the harsh conditions actually experienced by the Jews.

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  9. After WWI, Germany was left in a state of devastation. They were blamed for starting WWI so the Treaty of Versailles led them to be in debt to many countries. Their economy and military was practically wiped out and their living conditions were low. When Hitler and the Nazis came to power, people had a sense of rejuvenation and when Hitler blamed their conditions on discriminated groups such as the Jewish, the people followed. Hitler’s rise to power served as the birth for his ideas on discrimination.
    When Murrow arrived at Buchenwald, the harsh conditions he saw were dreadful. A German there told him, “We are very efficient”. This was not wrong at all, the people there, under the little strips of cloth, were given few pieces of bread and small rations of stew every day. During the time Murrow was there, he encountered doctors, professors, and a communist. Murrow was most shocked by the how many deaths occur there every day. I was most shocked by how everyone has their own code and was almost treated as if they were products, not human.
    When Murrow says the line, he was bringing out a serious point that he feels needs to be addressed and needs to be in people’s minds for things to change. He wanted to ensure that what he was saying was not something that should be questioned and something that makes people hurt enough for them to care.
    While Murrow makes sympathize the people who went through the event, he also argues that the people who died can’t be ignored. He believes that everyone should know what is going on in these camps and hopes to influence his audience into either aiding the victims or preventing a future scenario similar to this. I believe that Murrow was successful because he viewed the victims as a whole rather than only separate groups.

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    • I agree with you in that they tried to harvest the sadness and anger in the people from WWI by blaming it on the many minorities in Germany and this angered many people more making them want to do something and punish the people for a crime that the people of Germany thought that they had committed.

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    • I agree. I think its horrible and shocking how the Nazis dehumanized the people imprisoned in the concentration camps and treated them like nothing

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  10. The first major event would be the Nuremberg Laws that limited the rights of Jewish citizens. Another major event would be Kristallnacht which destroyed many Jewish property and killed around 90 people. After the night of broken glass the Jews were being held in ghettos with poor conditions. Soon the Jews were being put into concentration camps and during that time Heinrich Himmler came up with the final solution.
    When the American troops arrived in Buchenwald the conditions were awful. Murrow says that he sees dead bodies everywhere, men to weak to stand and that there is an awful smell. Murrow encountered doctors, professors, mayor of Prague, children and weak/dying prisoners. I think that Murrow was most shocked about the condition of the prisoners. He kept describing how most prisoners were too weak to walk, how most prisoners had more bone than flesh and prisoners falling dead. I am most shocked about how the Nazis went through with this. They treated the prisoners as if they were nothing. They only thought of them as people who deserved to be killed because they are “inferior” to their race. Murrow said that he’s not sorry if anyone was offended because he wants the audience to understand all the horrible things that happened at Buchenwald. His tone at the end is angry which makes sense because his friend Bob Edwards said that he was so angry he didn’t write his report until three days later.

    Murrow is trying to tell us all the horrible things that happened at Buchenwald so we can understand how awful things were during that time. I think his argument is that he’s trying to tell us all these horrible things so, it won’t happen again the future. He doesn’t want Buchenwald to repeat itself in the future. Murrow wants his listeners to feel the same emotions he had and wants us to learn how the prisoners were being treated at concentration camps. He wants us to believe that what happened is wrong and should never happen again. I think that Murrow has achieved his goal because many people who have listened understand that what happened at Buchenwald was horrible and should never happen again

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  11. The events starting in 1933 in Germany was that they began slowly isolating groups of people from society. It started out by segregating them and then it transformed into moving the people into certain areas are from the general society. This happened in part because the government of Germany needed people to blame for all the problems they were having and it was easy to blame a group when the people where very vulnerable and blaming these people actual brought many people of Germany together on a common cause and it was to persecute the minorities.

    The conditions when Murrow arrived were really bad the people were living in horse stables and the stables were overcrowded housing to many people. The camp smelled really bad and many dead were lying around. I feel like the men that the Americans found at the camp where men who had hope when there was no light at the end of the tunnel and men who had lost everything but still had fight left in them. They encountered starving men, dying men, and fighting men. What probably shocked Murrow the most was how bad the conditions at the camp were and how positive some of the people were and how the children could smile and be happy considering how they were living. What shocked me the most is how many people died and how the kids could smile and be happy. What also shocked me was the fact that people could see this and let it happen, it also shocked me how anyone could have any fight left after all of this.

    The tone of Murrow at the end when he says that he hopes that he does not offend anyone in this account was very sad and sincere like he really meant what he was saying. It also sounds like he has seen a lot and been through a lot going to the camp.

    I think the argument that Murrow is trying to express is that the Germans have committed murder and should be punished and that they did not just murder a few but thousands and even millions making this genocide. He wanted everyone to know exactly how bad the camps were and what the Germans had done to these innocent people.

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    • I agree that the segregation was one of the problems, however it did not start the Holocaust. It is a good point, but there were earlier events which caused the segregation. Economic instability is the primary reason why so many people were annexed and killed in Germany.

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  12. From 1933, Germany finally took action in regards with the anti-Semitic and nationalist feeling building all throughout Europe. They created the first concentration camp at Dachau that was eventually used to house Jews and others they deemed “unfit” as part of their final solution to just simply exterminate these people. The government was in full support of this discrimination and the actions it took made the people no longer afraid to discriminate.

    The conditions were beyond awful by accounts of Murrow’s description with people dropping dead on the spot. Murrow encountered people whom he could see the bones of from starvation and those who were too weak to even rise from bed, this is perhaps what shocked Murrow the most. I was personally shocked by the approval by those following Murrow as they spoke like they were proud to give him a tour of the camp.

    At the end of the broadcast Murrow states how he is not the least bit sorry for these descriptions and states it in a matter-of-fact tone with aggression to mostly address the resulting ignorance that may become of people to be listening at home. Murrow was trying to make the audience realize what atrocities happened during World War 2 and what everyone else around the world was oblivious to. He wanted his listeners to realize how large scale and horrendous these actions were and that this was no small occurrence. To an extent, I believe that he achieved his goal with choice dialogue that represented the truth behind all of this. However, stating in some parts how he had no words to describe certain sights lessened the impact of feeling as there was nothing to scale it to in order to feel how terrible the sight actually was.

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  13. Germany was not in the best economic state when Hitler came to power. So instead of fixing it straight away he blamed the Jews, which consequently caused many concentration and death camps to spring up over Germany. Hitler blamed Jews for most of everything that went wrong, and the Germans went with it because discrimination is a “solution” to problems.
    Murrow was abhorred by the conditions at this camp because these people were so weak some of them could not even get out of their beds. I think Murrow is mostly astounded at the number of people dead and the sights he has seen. I think the most terrible part of Buchenwald is the amount of people that were put here. People were literally stacked upon each other in the crowded rooms.
    Murrow is trying to describe the horrors which he say in Buchenwald. He is trying to show people what has happened to people in these terrible situations. I believe Murrow is being strict and critical because he hopes readers do not just feel sympathy, but try to help people who survived concentration and death camps.
    I think Murrow did and excellent job of showing the rest of Europe and perhaps the world what not to be like. I believe Murrow is not only arguing that concentration camps are terrible but the person who started them is terrible as well. Murrow is presenting the atrocities of the camps as evidence to prove that Hitler is a horrid man and no one should be like him. I believe Murrow accomplished his goal because he used a sense of imagery which was terribly vivid, which helped readers see in their minds what had happened in Buchenwald. Murrow also included dialogue from some of the survivors to show how desperate they were.

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    • I agree with your points but I don’t fell like Murrow is trying to present who caused what. It seemed like he was just trying to inform everyone of everything terrible that had happened and was not relating it to just the war.

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  14. 1.) After Germany’s big involvement in WWl, they were hit hard by the consequences imposed by the Treaty of Versailles. They were blamed entirely for the war, just them and no other country they were allied with. This resulted in Germany, being put into deep debt, and forced them to find a way to relieve themselves from this. All of this gave rise to very violent and murderous leader by the name of Adolf Hitler. He promised Germany that he had a quick and easy way to build their country back up. Because of Germany’s terrible conditions at the time, most people followed his orders. Hitler needed someone to blame for Germany’s terrible state at the time, so he quickly came to the conclusion that it was the Jews fault. There purpose of hunting down these innocent Jews to put them in concentrations and kill them off, and make what Hitler wanted known as the “perfect race” and eradicate all the undesirables that includes people who were mentally ill, people who did not have blonde hair, blue eyes, people with physical disabilities, and many more. These actions normalized discrimination by killing of those who Hitler felt did not fit into the society he was looking to create.
    2.) When Murrow and the American troops arrive in Buchenwald the conditions were absolutely horrific. Murrow’s first words about the place were “There surged around me an evil-smelling stink, men and boys reached out to touch me.” With that being said this implies that Germans were putting these people through the most inhumane things a person can live in. Murrow also witnessed records of the death rates that increased everyday due to starvation, disease, and people having no desire to try to withstand these conditions. Murrow encountered Germans, Englishmen, Czechoslovaks, a mayor of Prague, professors from Poland, doctors from Vienna, men from all over Europe, and prisoners of different racial descent. I think Murrow was mostly shocked because of what the Nazis had done and because the U.S. did not know about this. What shocked me was that Nazis had no problem going through with this terrible act.
    3.) Murrow’s tone when he says this very angry. In fact he did not record it until three days after, and he was furious by everything he witnessed leading up to the point of him saying what he said.
    4.) Murrow is trying to make the argument to express how bad concentration camps were and made a very strong argument about it. He wants people to feel a sense of anger towards the Germans and poignant for the prisoners. I think he achieved his goal because when U.S. forces liberated the concentration camps they forced Germans to see their horrible actions.

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  15. Germany was in very bad shape after WWI. Economically they basically had nothing. When Hitler came in and said that he could fix it and it wasn’t the Germans fought, the Germans believed him. When Hitler came to power he made it clear he did not like jews, disabled people, homosexuals, anyone who wasnt his “ideal person.” Soon he passed the Nuremberg Laws which made discriminating against jews perfectly normal, meaning violence and hate towards jews increase.

    The conditions at the concentration camp disgust me. There were people starving, being beaten, some people were so weak they could not get out of bed. Even six year olds were forced to live in these conditions. The smell of the concentration camp was beyond words. Murrow encountered a lot pf very smart people like politicians and teachers. I think what shocked him the most was the amount of people dead because he says “God alone knows how many men and boys have died there during the last 12 years. Thursday, I was told that there were more than 20,000 in the camp. There had been as many as 60,000. Where are they now?” What shocked me the most was that there were six year olds in there. They were starving probably being beaten and in no way can they handle those types of things.

    At the end of the broadcast Murrow sounds angry. I think his tone is angry because he feels like everyone should know that a terrible thing happened, that concentration camps are awful . I thik he feels that everyone should know all the details no matter how awful they are.

    I think Murrow’s argument is that everyone should know what is going on. This was not something that you could ignore. It was a big deal; it was genocide. He thought that people were acting like it wasn’t as big of a deal as it was. He wanted people to know what actually happened.

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    • I agree with what you said about Murrow’s argument. He didn’t want people to ignore the fact that this was genocide and these people were living in such awful conditions.

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      • I wouldn’t say that Murrow sounded angry at the end of the broadcast, but instead disappointed. I think that he was disappointed in the way the prisoners were being treated and in the fact that not many people were aware of what life was like inside the concentration camps.

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  16. The Nazi party rose to power around 1933, which marked the beginning of the Holocaust. The Holocaust consisted of massive persecution of many different people, but the majority of the focus was on the widespread genocide of the Jewish population. Germany became a very anti-Semitic country and put most of the blame for economic issues on the Jews. The Nuremberg Laws which prevented the Jewish people from many basic rights is an example of the anti-Semitism that occurred. The Nazis later moved the Jews to the Ghetto’s and lastly the concentration camps. All of this made Jewish hate and discrimination a norm in Germany. The Jews had been subjected to racism for years which is why when they Nazis attempted to murder all of the Jews with the Final Solution.

    The conditions in Buchenwald were horrible. Dozens of dead bodies were piled up and the survivors were stuck in unclean and unsafe living conditions. Many of the people Murrow came in contact with were barely alive. They had been sick and starving for years. The majority of them were everyday people, many of which were Jewish. Murrow seemed to be shocked by the terrible conditions and death tolls of the camp. Murrow finds it very unpleasant by how they keep the dead bodies since they cannot be buried. I also found the conditions to be very unpleasant sounding along with the shape and mentality of the people who had suffered through the concentration camp.

    Murrow sounds very upset when he delivers that line. Almost as if he knows how much worse it was than what he is describing and he dislikes that people cannot take the truth. His tone is distraught and sickened by the terrible things he had seen.

    Murrow is trying to tell people about the evil things the Nazis have done. He does not want people to be naïve to what happened during the Holocaust. Murrow’s job is to present to people the real truth about what happened and that the Nazis can’t get away with the genocide of the Jews. He wants people to know the truth and understand the horrible things that happened during the holocaust. He wants them to think of it as disgusting and horrible. I do think he achieved the goal because he paints a very vivid picture of everything that happened.

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  17. Hitler’s rise to power and that passing of the anti-Semitic Nuremberg laws created an atmosphere where discrimination was acceptable. The laws stripped Jews of many of their rights. So not only was there a sense of Germans feeling superior to others, there was also a set of laws that stated it.

    The conditions were horrible, most people were on the verge of death, or had given up hope. Murrow encounters a wide variety of men in the camp: Germans, doctors, the sick, and visiting Americans who were captured. I think Murrow was shocked most by the way everything around the concentration camp was unaffected by the war. The thing that shocked me most was that the conditions of the camp were worse than how Murrow had described them.

    Murrow sounded aggrieved and full hostility when making that comment. He obviously was upset by the unfair treatment of the Jews, and deep down he probably wished he could have down more to publicize what he knew.

    Murrow is trying to express the disgust he has for the Germans and what they put people through. He wants his audience to feel the same way if not more intense. I believe he got his point across because even today people look at the Holocaust as an atrocity.

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    • I agree that Murrow wants the reader to feel the same way if not worse because of what the Germans did to millions of innocent people. He wants the world to know that this genocide is not okay at all and that nobody should be forced to live and work in such terrible conditions.

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    • I completely agree with you on all of this. Your views and thoughts on all of this align with mine, and you make excellent points.

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  18. Because of WWI, Germany’s economy was in poor shape. When Hitler and the Nazis came to power in 1933, they looked to blame someone for the poor economic state. They ended up blaming Jews, among other peoples that Hitler saw as “unfit.” Eventually, laws known as the Nuremburg Laws were put in place making it legal for people to discriminate against the people that were blamed for Germany’s problems. This discrimination is what ultimately lead to the Final Solution.

    At Buchenwald, the conditions are extremely awful. There is a pungent odor throughout the camp and men upon men are sick, starving, and dying. There are piles of dead men throughout the camp. Also, the rations that the people in the camps get are very minimal which is why they’re starving to death. I think what shocked Murrow the most was the condition of the prisoners. He kept bringing up how sickly they looked and how bad the conditions were, yet they were still positive and smiling. What shocked me the most were the numbers. There were 1200 people crammed in an area meant for 80 horses. There were 5 men to a bunk. Also, the fact that this was considered one of the nicest camps to be in was extremely shocking to me.

    When Murrow says this line in the broadcast, he puts stress on the word “mild” because he knows that he could have made it a lot worse by not leaving out certain details. He sounds very frustrated and disgusted about the whole thing because he believes that the report needed to be made so people could at least have a glimpse as to what it was like in Buchenwald.

    I think that Murrow’s arguments is trying to bring to everyone’s attention how awful the conditions were in these camps so that we don’t just brush it off and ignore it. He wants to bring it to people’s attention so that we wont forget it and so that we don’t let it happen again in the future.

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    • I agree on your point that Murrow is trying to spread the idea that the concentration camps was not what it was really like. The living conditions were terrible and people were often crowed in the concentration camp. I also agreed, that Murrow sounds frustrated when he delivered the line, his tone was serious.

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  19. In Germany, as of 1933, the holocaust was beginning and the slaughter of millions was being justified by the Nazi party. As the nation was left in economic and political shambles, the Germans were looking to blame someone rather than take the responsibility. It was unfortunate events that led to the conclusion in which Jews were blamed and killed. This blame was the start of discrimination and the acceptance of it as well. When the American troops arrived, they were witnesses to the cruelty of these concentration camps as people were starving and suffering to death. Everyone Murrow encountered was misshapen and thin from malnutrition as they only received few rations. Murrow was surprised to find how many people who dying each day and the horrible conditions in which the survivors were in. His description of these individuals was very disheartening to me as well. When Murrow states that he is not sorry for telling people how the camps are, he has a rather egregious tone. He feels that people should be informed of the truth behind the holocaust and that people should hide from what is happening. I believe that Murrow feels that his broadcast should be the start of a movement. A motivational tool to help people of these camps as well as bring Americans to help serve justice to these people. He hopes to be the start of the movement to end the holocaust.

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  20. The rise of the Nazi Party and ultimately Hitler led to the Final Solution in Germany. The purpose of the Nazi Party was to eliminate anyone that was inferior to the stability of the Nazi regime and those they were inferior included: communists, Slavic people, Africans, disabled people, socialist, the Roma, Jehovah’s Witness, Jewish people, and homosexuals. The Nazi Party was able to place the blame of the war and loosing the war on Jewish people as well as others thought to be inferior.

    When Murrow and the American soldiers arrived the conditions were absolutely horrific. A stable that once was the home to 80 horses was now a place the slept 1200 men, each bunk holding five people. Murrow met all types of people, some included: doctors from Vienna, professors from Poland,men from Europe and America, and lots of young children. I think what shocked Murrow most about his experience in Buchenwald is that all of the people in the camp had their own story of who they were, where they came from, and what type of job they had. The most shocking thing to me was the fact that these people who used to live everyday lives were forced to live in harsh and dehumanizing conditions all because they were Jewish, homosexuals, disabled, and etc. They amount of people that were killed, the amount of sick, and the pits of dead bodies is absolutely terrible.

    Murrow sounds very cold and harsh when he delivers that line because I think he is trying to make the point that the way the people in these concentration camps were being treated was absolutely atrocious as he gives the reader a very small and mild account of what he saw.

    Murrow wants to make the readers feel like this act of dehumanizing people by working them to death, barely feeding them, and taking them prisoner based on their religion is absolutely disgusting and it should never ever happen again. I believe he wants to make his listeners feel very bad for everyone who was persecuted because Hitler and the Nazi Party didn’t like them. I also believe he is sending a message to everyone around the world basically saying why did we not help these helpless people when they needed help the most. I believe he did achieve his goal of shedding light on the atrocities Hitler and all of his followers committed as this broadcast sadly shows the Holocaust in the actual way it was. He gives mere details but in they way the story is told you can tell he does not at all believe in any way what happened was okay and I think that helps the readers see the truth.

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    • I believe the killings of many different ethnic groups was shocking, but I believe the most shocking was the amount of people the Nazis actually killed. They could’ve stated their plans, and never followed through with it, but what makes the Nazis such a big deal is the amount of people they killed.

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  21. Numerous events led to the “Final Solution” that created the basis for German support of the atrocities that occur during the period. First, as Hitler and the Nazi party rose to power they started to promote Anti-Semitic movements across the state that radicalized the people against the Jewish population as well as other minorities. Later the Nuremberg Laws proposed laws that stripped Jewish people of rights that involved them with German culture and prevented them from getting jobs that were very involve with positions of power such as lawyers or journalists. In addition the Nazi Party used an assassination of a German diplomat by a Jewish teenager to essentially wage war on the Jew across German territory.

    Murrow describes that the prisoners within the concentration camp, “”blessed the name of Roosevelt”. It shows that after all the horrors they faced that some had survive and there was finally a sense of hope among these people. Murrow meets people of every single type of occupation and background, wheter it was American Jews visiting family or normal German citizens. I feel like Murrow was deeply disturbed by the massive amounts of dead bodies and sheer numbers he encounter while walking through Buchenwald. What astounds and confuses me s that fact that this seems to be in the middle of WWII, and American journalist is allowed to document this as if the Germans are trying to promote the things they are doing to people. It doesn’t make sense to me, so unless I’m misunderstanding something or there was some type of peace treaty at the time I don’t get why the Germans and people like the Czech and French are okay with what was happening.

    Murrow understands how the people at home view this situation. Much like today how no one in America can understand the suffering in the Middle East and Africa regardless of their stance on the situation. I think its why so many soldiers look at war with such disdain nowadays. The American people may hear numbers and understand people are dying, but until someone describes how children are people branded and hundred dying per day they dismiss the problem much like how we do today when it comes to war across the globe. Which is inevitably what i think Murrow is trying to
    “argue”. That this situation, the massive annihilation of a People and its culture is something that should not be happening and needs to be stopped.

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  22. Numerous events led to the Final Solution that created the basis for German support of the atrocities that occur during the period. First, as Hitler and the Nazi party rose to power they started to promote Anti-Semitic movements across the state that radicalized the people against the Jewish population as well as other minorities. Later the Nuremberg Laws proposed laws that stripped Jewish people of rights that involved them with German culture and prevented them from getting jobs that were very involve with positions of power such as lawyers or journalists. In addition the Nazi Party used an assassination of a German diplomat by a Jewish teenager to essentially wage war on the Jew across German territory.

    Murrow describes that the prisoners within the concentration camp, “”blessed the name of Roosevelt”. It shows that after all the horrors they faced that some had survive and there was finally a sense of hope among these people. Murrow meets people of every single type of occupation and background, wheter it was American Jews visiting family or normal German citizens. I feel like Murrow was deeply disturbed by the massive amounts of dead bodies and sheer numbers he encounter while walking through Buchenwald. What astounds and confuses me s that fact that this seems to be in the middle of WWII, and American journalist is allowed to document this as if the Germans are trying to promote the things they are doing to people. It doesn’t make sense to me, so unless I’m misunderstanding something or there was some type of peace treaty at the time I don’t get why the Germans and people like the Czech and French are okay with what was happening.

    Murrow understands how the people at home view this situation. Much like today how no one in America can understand the suffering in the Middle East and Africa regardless of their stance on the situation. I think its why so many soldiers look at war with such disdain nowadays. The American people may hear numbers and understand people are dying, but until someone describes how children are people branded and hundred dying per day they dismiss the problem much like how we do today when it comes to war across the globe. Which is inevitably what i think Murrow is trying to
    “argue”. That this situation, the massive annihilation of a People and its culture is something that should not be happening and needs to be stopped.

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  23. The beginning of Germany’s events in 1933 were basically the slaughtering of any ethnic groups that Adolf Hitler and the Nazis believed the ethnic group was inferior to themselves (basically everyone). The Jews were their primary target because almost everything the Jews believed in was not the same as the Nazis, and the Jews were also blamed for economic and political problems after WWI. When Edward Murrow and the American troops arrived in a concentration camp in Germany known as Buchenwald, it was immediately clear that this was a genocide. Their was a stable for horses that now contained actual humans and 242 out of 1200 people in the stables died a month. Murrow then witnessed 3 men die right in front of him as soon as he left the stable. Next, when he stopped by the hospital, he found out that the day before he came 200 people died of tuberculosis, starvation, fatigue, and people who desired to die. Murrow then discovered “the march” killed 6000 people, and the days after that, 900 people died per day. I believed these stats surprised him the most, and I agree that this was the most surprising information from just a day in Buchenwald. I believe Murrow intended how he wasn’t sorry as in a way to say that he only gave the people small and minor information of the events he experienced in the concentration camp. Murrow is trying to say that the people should be thanking him for not giving them the crazy and unimaginable information. I believe that Murrow is trying to give us facts on the genocide and how it is wrong in every way, and people need to find a way to stop it. Despite Murrow had exceptional information and inspired others, I believe he didn’t achieve his goal. Murrow frightened people instead of making them want to fight. It wasn’t America’s business anyways, until the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, 3 years after Murrow’s report.

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  24. In 1933 the Nazi rise to power had started to gain speed. And with so many people upset after all of the mistreatment of the Germans they were willing to believe whatever Hitler told them. So when he blamed the Jews and setup concentration camps many of the Germans followed him with all of their hearts.
    In Buchenwald people had little food poor living conditions and lots of hard manual labor. Murrow encountered men of all different kinds. He met an American but he also met people from the Balkans, and Italy, and France, and England. I was shocked not only by the fact that after years of horrible mistreatment some still had hope as well as the fact that they could live in such close proximity to death without having a reaction.
    His tone is that he doesn’t think anyone should be offended by what he said because what he said is the truth and It should be stopped and that anyone who doesn’t think that is wrong.
    He is trying to make the argument that The Nazi’s are doing awful things. He wants the listeners to hate the Nazi’s and feel bad for the people within the concentration camps. He does quite a good job of this because he shows the worst parts of the camps and then adds on to that by showing that it is one of the best camps.

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  25. The main event that led to the Final Solution was WWI. The Nazis needed someone to put the blame of the war on, so they chose a group that they saw as weak and inferior to do so, the Jews. Also, Hitler wanted to purify the German race, this resulted in the genocide of Jews, communists, Slavs, Africans, socialists, homosexuals, etc. These actions normalized discrimination because the mass killing of these groups made it look natural that some ethnic groups were inferior to others.

    The American troops arrived at the German concentration camps when the Holocaust was concluding. At the camp, Murrow encountered men who were so mistreated they did not even look like human beings. The prisoners were extremely weak due to the heavy labor, long working hours, malnutrition, unsanitary living conditions, and some due to the scientific experiments performed on them. I think that what shocked Murrow the most was the number of men and boys who died everyday. He repeatedly states that he stopped and counted the people with crosses by their names in the doctors book, or the number of bodies neatly stacked in the camp. What shocked me the most was the fact that the German officers at the camp did not seem to care about the prisoners, they did not care about their well beings, and they did not care about being the ones responsible for this violation to human rights.

    Murrow nearly shows no emotion when he delivers this line, he sounds cold and direct. He possesses this tone because he wants to show the audience that he is still in shock from what he saw at the camp. In addition, Murrow emphasizes the word “mild” to let the reader know that what he narrated was not the full description of the atrocities he witnessed at Buchenwald.

    Morrow’s argument tries to show his audience the abominations that took place at the concentration camps. He wants to illustrate the living conditions for the prisoners at the camps, as well as the actions and crimes committed by the German officers. I personally think that Murrow achieved his goal, his description of his experience gave me an extremely graphic representation of the life at camp.

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    • I agree that Murrow displayed almost no emotion in his broadcast as if he was trying to protect his credibility and wanting more people to take him seriously as he delivered the cold hard facts.

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  26. 1. Germany was in the midst of chaos, Nazi’s abusing the Jewish populations. Jewish people were being stripped of their rights and segregated from other Germans. These actions were used to exterminate the “lesser” races in Germany.
    2. The conditions are horrible and depressing in Buchenwald. When Murrow arrives there were people that were too weak to even walk, they were starved, and the camp was dirty and smelly. Murrow met people who were skinny, and weak. He also met people that were so weak they could barely even clap. He also met children that showed obvious signs of neglect. The thing that probably shocked Murrow as well as me the most was probably the death rates, the day before they arrived at least 200 people dies within those 24 hours.
    3. Murrow seems serious and unemotional when he says the line, I think that means he was at the pre disposition as soon as he laid his eyes on this disaster and cruelty.
    4. I feel Murrow is trying to convince people to believe that these people were horribly mistreated and the Nazi’s had the guilt of an entire people upon them. He want’s his viewers to understand what these people have been through, what they will still go through and how the Nazi’s were cruel. I believe that he had achieved his goal, he really made me understand all that these people had to go through, the physical condition they were in was horrid and I personally felt sorry for them.

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  27. Hitler rose to power by telling the german people that he had an easy way out of Germany’s problems and that it wasn’t their fault. He would place the blame on just about any group that wasn’t an ”ideal” german, such as the Jews. That blame grew into actions against them like the Nuremberg laws, then the death camps. The amount of blame being placed on the minorities as well as the gradual rise in the severity of the discrimination led to its normalization.

    Morrow saw extremely over-worked and underfed people that were anywhere from 6 to 60 years old living in old horse stables with thousands of other people, people who were anything from a professor to the mayor of a city. These people only got one meal a day and the hospital was practically over-flowing. I think Morrow was the most shocked by just how young some of the kids were, I was shocked by the comments of a few former prisoners about how Buchenwald was nice compared to other camps.

    I think that Morrow’s tone reflects on how what he saw was so terrible to the point he would rather not go into more detail about the conditions if he could avoid it, which he could so he did.

    He is trying to make the argument that these camps aren’t just one more thing to add to the list of what the axis powers has done wrong, its an atrocity that they needed to focus on. Their were starving, sick people far from home, not knowing who in their family was still alive. He was trying to say that this wasn’t something you heard about in the news, this actually happened and it is just as bad, if not worse, than what people were saying. I think he got that message across well, the of his descriptions of people painted a picture of just how neglected these people were and made you wish you could help them.

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  28. 1) In 1933, during Hitler’s rise to power, he set out to get rid of any threat to Nazi regime or inferior groups. This was the holocaust which resulted in the systematic killing of around eleven to seventeen million people. These reforms targeted many different groups of people, 6 million of which were Jewish. Discrimination became a part of peoples’ everyday lives with the Nuremberg Laws.
    2) The conditions at Buchenwald were horrifying at the time of Murrow’s arrival. 1200 Men were crammed into tight spaces like a stable meant for 80 horses. During his time there, Murrow encountered men from many different backgrounds like doctors and professors and described the victims as “marked by death”. I believe that what shocked Murrow the most was the same for me being the piles of dead men stacked in the courtyard of the camp.
    3) When Murrow says that he is the least bit sorry for sharing his account of Buchenwald, he means that he does not care if this disturbed you or made you lose your appetite (like he warned of in the beginning), he just cares about sharing the horrifying truth.
    4) Through his report, Murrow attempts to make the argument that we should not turn a blind eye to what is happening to so many innocent people and more people need to not only take action to end these circumstances but also educate themselves on what is actually occurring. He tries to make his listeners feel pain for the victims of the Holocaust. This works as the audience empathizes for the prisoners of these camps.

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  29. 1) Events leading to the Final Solution were events all occurred in WW1 with German conflict and the Nazis gaining control of many territories. The purpose of the Nazis was to try and eliminate those who went against the Nazi Party and what they were trying to accomplish. Nazis tried to blame WW1 on the Jews.
    2) The conditions were terrible and didn’t seem like healthy living conditions. Murrow met doctors from Vienna, professors from Poland and European men. I think Murrow was most shocked by the amount of U.S. recognition because the U.S. didn’t even know about what was going on. I was shocked the most about the dead horses in the conditions.
    3) Morrow’s tone would be described as annoyed and furious about what he witnessed.
    4) The argument he is trying to make is how brutal this event was and how it is important to prevent something this horrific from ever happening again. He wants listeners to feel angry, to learn about the conditions, and to believe that something this horrible could occur. I think he achieved that goal because of the depth of his descriptions.

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  30. The events which led to the Final Solution in Germany include the establishment of the Nuremberg Laws, Kristallnacht, and growing discrimination against Jewish people. The purpose of these events were to have the Germans more unified and annihilate the Jewish population of Europe. The actions normalized discrimination by making it legal and accepted to harm a Jewish person living in Germany. The conditions in Buchenwald were unbearable. Thousands of Jews and people imprisoned by Nazis were mistreated and malnourished. Murrow was shown around and described the place as filthy and having a stench. He encountered many different men from the Americas and Europe in the concentration camp, including the former mayor of Prague, Petr Zenkl. I think Murrow was shocked by the large amount of Jews and people that were placed in concentration camps and mistreated and killed. I was shocked about how weak the people were and how they could drop dead at any moment. He sounds angry after delivering that line. He is trying to argue that the Germans could not have turned the other cheek over something as atrocious as this. Murrow wants the audience to feel sad about the acts of the Nazis and wants to show the Germans what their country has done. I think he did because he did a good job on describing how the Buchenwald concentration camp was and how horrible the acts of the Nazis were.

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  31. There were several events in Germany after 1933 that led to the Final Solution. One example of of this event is the Nuremberg Laws. These laws restricted the rights of Jewish people rather severely. They restricted who Jewish people could employ as household servant, where they could
    go, even what jobs they could have. The pogroms are another example of an event that led to the Final Solution in Germany. They were widespread, planned attacks by the Nazi party that targeted Jewish people. Overall 91 people were killed and many Jewish businesses and synagogues were destroyed. Another event that led to the Final Solution was the removal of Jewish people into Ghettos, and the placement of Jews into concentration camps. All of these events were meant to terrorize, harm, and discriminate against Jews. Theses occasions all normalized discrimination against Jews because they showed that the government supported, and actively discriminated against Jews, thus making it okay to discriminate against Jews. The Nuremberg Laws particularly helped to make discrimination against Jews normal because they made discrimination against Jews a part of everyday life.
    The conditions in Buchenwald when Murrow and the American troops arrived were appalling and horrifying. They encountered men and children who had been starved to the point that you could see the bones through their shirts. So many people died that the doctors could only estimate the number of dead. He met men and children who, in most cases, had done nothing wrong yet they were being punished in the cruelest sense of the word. Murrow encountered men from all over Europe, men who were at Buchenwald for various reasons, but none of them deserved to be treated the way that they were. I think what shocked Murrow the most about Buchenwald was the fact that so many people had died or were walking the fine line between being alive and being dead, while the people in surrounding villages and towns were well-fed, well dressed, and they didn’t seem to be impacted at all by the war. What shocked me the most about Murrow’s description was the fact that the men who had lived in the concentration camps held President Roosevelt in such high regards, even the fact that they knew about him at all shocked me because I would assume that they wouldn’t have had access to knew information regarding the war, especially if it showed that the Germans might be losing the war.
    Murrow’s tone when he says “If I have offended you by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, I am not the least bit sorry.” is challenging and defiant, as if he is challenging the listeners to be offended by the simplified version of what he saw at Buchenwald.
    Murrow makes the argument that what happened at Buchenwald was horrific, and that it was all true. He made the argument that even though before he had gone to Buchenwald he had been skeptical of what supposedly happened at concentration camps, but he is stating that all those accounts couldn’t even compare to the horror that he witnessed a Buchenwald. His goal when he aired this broadcast was to inspire horror in his listeners about the way that the people in concentration camps were being treated, and he wanted people to know of the ghastly conditions under which tens of thousands of people were made to live in in that one camp alone. I think that he achieved his goal because he inspire horror in anyone who listens to this broadcast on behalf of the millions of people who were forced into concentration camps.

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  32. 1. Actions taken towards the Final Solution included the Nuremberg Code and the establishment of ghettos. The Nuremberg Code restricted the rights of people seen as a hindrance to the country and kept them restrained. The ghettos were later developed when a large number of Jewish people began fleeing Germany, and worked to contain these people in one concentrated area. This encouraged discrimination, as the law itself said that Jews (and others in the same circumstance) were below the Germans and visually separated them from the “true” citizens.

    2. The camps were dirty, unclean, and gross. Over a thousand men were kept in an area only big enough for eighty horses; there was around five people to every single bed. The men were so weakened they couldn’t get out of bed, and could barely clap for their liberators. The people were starving (their ribs could be seen through their shirts) and disease such as tuberculosis was easily spread through the camps. Murrow seemed mostly shocked at the vast number of murders at these camps. At the start of the camp twelve years before, over 60,000 people had entered, while only 1,200 remained. Dead bodies were piled everywhere. What shocked me was that Murrow knew one man but he could no longer recognize him. For a man to be so changed that he was unrecognizable requires an extreme level of abuse I didn’t know was possible.

    3. He includes this to emphasize how terrible conditions in the death camp were, and we have no right to complain about how the stories make us uncomfortable when people actually had to suffer through it. His tone is somber and sorrowful, as no human should have to face those conditions. It saddened him to see these people in such a weakened and abused state.

    4. His argument is that the treatment people faced in concentration camps during the Holocaust was unjust and horrid, and that this tragedy should be known and prevented from ever happening again. He wants listeners to picture just how horrific the conditions in these camps were and what prisoners had to face on a daily basis. He wants them to know just how many people were murdered in a single camp, and for us to sympathize and prevent it from occurring again. I feel he was very successful, as his descriptions were very visual and graphic. I was able to picture well what he saw, and it is something I never wish to see.

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    • I agree with your thoughts on point #4, his goals on trying to spread the message so this horrific event will never happen again. Also, you said his other goal was to paint a picture in other people’s mind so they can picture it. I could visualize the event, and I too wish never to see it again.

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  33. Starting around 1933 the Nazi Party were gaining popularity. An idea instigated by the party was to exterminate races that were “inferior” to the German population. This resulted in the discrimination of “inferior” races, such as the Jews. Germany passed the Nuremberg Laws that caused Jew’s rights to be restricted. In 1939, there was the Kirstallnacht, which caused a large amount of emigration from Germany to the United States. After the invasion of Poland, Germany would begin the “Final Solution” to exterminate the Jews. This led to extermination camps to be created.
    When Murrow and the troops arrived, Murrow described the harsh living conditions of people in the concentration camp. The living spaces were cramped. He was told the space once held horses. The camp was also unsanitary. The camp was not properly cared for. The most shocking experience for Murrow seemed to be when he went to the crematorium and saw the deceased prisoners of the camp. The most shocking for me would be the area where the prisoners lived. The area had originally held horses but was turned into a place to house people.
    Murrow’s tone from saying, “If I have offended you by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, I’m not in the least sorry,” seems to be a serious tone because he wanted to convey his serious thinking about what had occurred at Buchenwald.
    Murrow wanted his listeners to have an idea of what occurred at Buchenwald. Through the broadcast, Murrow is trying to convey how the world did not know about what was happening to people within Germany and is angry about how something like about Buchenwald and how it could happen without being known to the world. I think from his broadcast, it would make people feel angry too because the world heard speculations about what happened in Germany, but was not fully followed through with, so when concentration camps were revealed, it made the speculations true.

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  34. 1) Racial tensions in Germany were long-standing, and Hitler was well aware. The financial success of many Jewish individuals was something that displeased many of the Germans, and this was one of many pre-existing laments that Hitler used to gain the support of the populous in his plans of rounding up and moving the people he deemed “undesirable.” The actions against these groups became commonplace, and civilians and soldiers alike began to become desensitized to such discrimination and atrocities.
    2) Buchenwald was in organized shambles when Murrow and the troops arrived. Men and boys were starved and poorly clothed, people were dropping dead around them, and the living conditions were unspeakable. People in the camp were from many different walks of life, and many different occupations. There was little to no leeway on who was brought in, as can be seen by Murrow meeting a leather worker, as well as the one-time mayor of Prague. Doctors, lawyers, and shopkeepers alike were all in the same degrading conditions. Murrow managed to keep his composure throughout the broadcast, however around the line
    “If I have offended you by this rather mild
    account of Buchenwald, I’m not in the least
    sorry.”
    you can seem to audibly hear his voice breaking. The experience as a whole was shaking for him, and to choose any one part which was more scarring is almost a mockery of the experience. Of course, the most potent of the scenes he describes is likely to be the courtyard in which there are upwards of 250 bodies piled naked on top of each other.
    3) Murrow’s tone when he says “If I have offended you by this rather mild
    account of Buchenwald, I’m not in the least sorry.” is barely discernible from the rest of the broadcast, but if you listen closely you can hear his voice break, as though choking back tears. This is indicative that he has been saddened by recounting this experience, and that if one is offended that he might do so, he does not care, as he has been permanently offended by having to see it himself.
    4) It would seem that a recurring part of this report is Murrow reminding his audience that the people and the country you see around the camps is lush and well cared for, at the expense of those inside the camp who find themselves being treated in the worst ways imaginable. As such, he is trying to, in a way villainize the German people and ultimately convey that he feels that the whole of Germany is to blame, not just Hitler.

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  35. Between 1933 and 1945 Jews, criminals and others that were different than the Nazis were sent to concentration and extermination camps. The purpose of these camps were to work people so hard under poor conditions that they died, or to use them for harmful medical experiments and torture before killing them either by poison gas or by burning the bodies. These tactics changed discrimination by knocking out everyone that was different; everyone that was left was the same.

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  36. Germany was really not doing so good after WW1 so Hitler saw his opportunity and blamed all of their failures on the Jews. Which led to the German people getting reunited by having the same enemy.When Murrow arrived, he saw what the holucaust had done to these people. They all were naked and starving. He was most shocked by the nazi smiling at the what they had done. I was most shocked by this too.Murro’s tone in the broadcast was uncaring. He talked like it was his every other news.His argument in this was that the holocaust shouldn’t be ignored like the rest of his stuff. He wants the listeners to to be mad and take some action as to what has happened. I think he has achieved his goal because I am feeling something like that even though I can’t do anything about it.

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  37. Starting in 1938, the Nazis led lots of attacks against the Jews in Germany, called Kristallnacht. There was lots of violence involved in this. When the situation started to resolve, many Jews fled Germany. In 1939, after they invaded Poland, Germany made their first ghetto. The ghettos were sometimes fully isolated or closed off so the Germans could keep the Jews in one place or keep track of them. The ghettos were not a cleanly place. Germany created its first concentration camp in 1933. The people being held in the camps were kept in very poor conditions and expected to work to the point where they could reach exhaustion or death. Almost 3.5 million people died between 1933 and 1945 due to concentration camps. These actions normalized discrimination because people would get used to seeing the Nazis target Jews, and other specific groups of people, and treating them terribly. They would start to think that maybe that’s the way they should be treated. They thought they were better than those targeted people.

    Buchenwald was built to last a long time. There were multiple people standing guard and it was under high protection. Murrow encountered people that were terrifyingly close to death. He encountered men that he had once met and/or known. There were people that were too weak to move or walk. However, as unimportant as he was, they were happy to see him and wanted to reach out to him. I think Murrow was most shocked about the large amount of people that were dead. There were just piles of dead people. What shocked me the most was also the amount of people that were dead. They would just stack the dead on top of each other, like they weren’t people.

    Murrow’s tone when he said that he wasn’t sorry if he offended people was cold. He didn’t feel bad, he was telling people what he had witnessed, and he wasn’t even telling them everything. They didn’t witness the horrific things that he did.

    Murrow was trying to make the argument that what the Germans were doing was wrong. He wanted the listeners to feel disgust and hatred for what the Germans were doing. He wanted the listeners to, as fully as possible, learn about what the concentration camps were like. What it was like to be in one. He wanted them to know what Germany was doing and he wanted them to believe that it was very vile and wrong. I do think he achieved his goal because many people hated Germany for what they were doing with concentration camps.

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  38. Between 1933 and 1945 many Jews, criminals, prisoners of war, and anyone who wasn’t a Nazi were sent to concentration and extermination camps. The point of these camps were to work people so hard under poor conditions that they died, or to use them for harmful medical experiments and torture before killing them either by means of poison gas or by burning the bodies. This changed discrimination by knocking out everyone who was different; now everyone that was left was a Nazi and they were all the same.
    All of the camps were very unclean and lots of disease was present. Over 1000 men were kept in areas that were only big enough for 80 horses, and there weren’t enough beds for all of them to sleep in; as many as five people shared a single bed. The people Murrow encountered were starving, sick, dead, and very harshly treated. Everyone in the camp was so skinny, and their ribs were visible because they were starved in these camps. I think Murrow was shocked most about how poorly these people were treated. They were forced to do hard work for long periods of time with little food or water, and they were kept in horrible living conditions. What shocked me most was that Murrow knew one the men but didn’t recognize him at all because it takes a lot to change someone so much that they are unrecognizable.
    He sounds just like he says he is, “not at all sorry”. He felt that people should be informed of this monstrosity that is occurring and he felt that they needed to be told exactly how it is, with every little . detail. So, I would say his tone is angry, and “not at all sorry”.
    Murrow is trying to express that Germany as a whole needs to be blames for everything that’s happening, not just Hitler because Germany seems fine, but it’s because of these camps. He wants everyone to realize how horrible Germans really are by exposing what horrible things they are doing to these people, most of which have done nothing wrong, they just aren’t liked because they’re different. I feel like he succeeded in explaining his argument and getting people on his side because he explained everything exactly as it was and without adding anything extra he was clearly able to express the horrible, awful things that these people are having to go through because of the Germans.

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  39. 1) The “Final Solution” was brought about by the destruction of Germany’s economy and political stability after WWI. The Treaty of Versailles kept the country well in debt trying to pay back the other countries due to their “starting” the first world war. At this time the Nazi Party was gaining influence due to their advocacy of the idea that Germany’s misfortune was caused by minorities not of pure German blood.
    2) The conditions at Buchenwald were extremely cramped and filthy. In a building that was used to stable 80 horses, 1200 men were made to fit in with five on each bunk. Murrow encountered many different types of men in the camp. As he puts it “Professors from Poland. Doctors from Vienna. Men from all Europe. Men from the countries that made America.” I think this would have surprised him because people from all over the world we being forced into this terrible place. This surprised me as well because I thought that it would only be people from Germany or from very close.
    3) Murrow’s tone when saying that he is not in the least bit sorry is very matter of fact. He isn’t sorry if he offends, scares, or upsets anyone because he believes that everyone needs to know what was going on at Buchenwald, no matter how terrible. But he does add that he hasn’t included every detail or event because he had no words for them. Which to me simply means that there are no words or way to properly describe what he witnessed to people that weren’t there.
    4) I believe that Murrow’s argument was to show people the reality of war and the cruelty of the German concentration camps. He wants his listeners to feel the misery and suffering of the people subjected to these terrors as well as learn from it. To hopefully project the feeling of anger towards what was happening and make people want to make sure it never happened again. I think that he achieved this because even if not every detail was given, the information was simple and terrifying in itself.

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    • I completely agree that with you that Murrow didn’t feel sorry about what he said because he had every right to tell people what was going on in Germany, they needed to know. And if knowing that such awful things were happening to people scared or offended you, then you should do something about it, not just sit there and get upset with the person who told you about it. He witnessed something horrible and he was just sharing what the experienced, he wasn’t doing it to offend or not offend anyone, he was simply doing it to inform people.

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  40. Many events occurred before the “Final Solution” act came into play, during Hitler and the Nazi rise to power.It was hard for Germany to recover from World War 1, so in order for Hitler to reunite Germany he blamed the Jews for Germany’s loss in the War. He started to promote anti-semitic movements across Germany against the Jews. He developed the Nuremberg Laws, which were laws that discriminated against the Jewish population and restricted them from having certain freedoms as non-Jewish Germans. The Nazis used the assassination of a German diplomat by a Jewish teenager to help them wage war against the Jewish people.

    When Murrow and the American troops arrived to Buchenwald, they were shocked by what they saw. Men were stuffed into old horse stables that used to hold 80 horses and there were 1200 men in it. Men were to weak to get out of their beds because of the lack of nutrition that they got. Murrow meet people that used to hold power such as the past mayor of Prague, he also meet doctors and chiefs. Thing that most shock Murrow were the German soldiers who looked ok with what was going on and what they were doing to these people. Some of the soldiers were even smiling which gave me a unpleasant feeling.

    Murrow was not the least bit sorry for what he had said on the radio broadcast because he wanted people to know the reality of the situation that is happening in Europe and what the Germans are doing to people. Murrow tune is very serious when he says this statement.

    Murrow wants the listeners to know about the situation in Europe and he wants people to understand the indescribable and unimaginary things that the Nazis are doing to the Jewish people. I believe he has done his job as a journalist and has achieved his goal of telling people about what war can be like.

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  41. 1) Beginning of 1993, Hitler becomes chancellor of Germany. With his power, he begins his goal, he starts out with the Nuremberg Laws limiting the rights of Jews. Then following the Nuremberg Laws, he strips the lands of the Jews, forcing them into ghettos. On, November 9, 1938, the event “Kristallnacht” or also known as Night of broken glass, where under the order of Goebbels, smashed and destroyed Jewish shops and synagogues. Jews were forced into concentration/execution camps where the Jews had to face harsh difficulties. With Jews in the camps, the goal was to exterminate the Jews, trying to eliminate Jews, and many other targets. Targets that were deemed by Hitler “inferior” were gypsies, Slavic individuals, and Judeocommunist, a term Hitler used to describe the most dangerous criminal and enemy of the Third Reich.

    2) The conditions at Buchenwald were bad. He described the men so weak they couldn’t get out of bed. The living men were so weak, their rib cage were popping out. Murrow encounter a man and he stated “I should be careful of my wallet if I were you” Based on this, there were individuals that would steal to try to live. What shocked Murrow the most, was crematorium were bodies were taken and executed. Bodies were stacked onto of each other and it wasn’t just men, there were boys in the crematorium. What shocked me was the food ration. He say only one piece of bread that was as thick as a thumb and a small piece of margarine. Like how do you work in these concentration camp and only get that much, that is pretty serve.
    3) His tone at the last line is frustrated, and disgusted about what happen and would like to spread attention to this topic. Murrow is sad however he doesn’t let his emotion fool him. No matter how bad the treatment was, Murrow is reminding people these events should not occur in history and wants to spread his accounts.
    4) His argument would be “Events like the Holocaust should never happen again”, he want to bring attention to this horrific event. I think this is like the phrase “History repeats itself”. Murrow doesn’t not want another massive genocide to happen. He did his goal, today everyone in schools are informed about the Holocaust and there is even a national holocaust museum, where we remember all the lives lost during the Holocaust. Hitler and his SS, SD failed to try to erase history by destroying the camps when the Americans were liberating the camps. I believe Murrow achieved his goal.

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    • I agree! I also believe that Murrow wants to inform people to make sure that they and future generations don’t let an event like this happen again because he has seen worse. He has seen worse than what he told and he doesn’t want it happening again.
      I too was shocked by the food ration. I estimate the food to be around 140 calories a day if not less. It’s no wonder why the men were so weak that they couldn’t move! I now wonder how long it took the freed prisoners to recover after being through such harsh conditions.

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  42. 1. The Final Solution was a result of the Nazi’s raise to power in Germany. And its purpose was to rid Germany of people Hitler deemed as inadequate or impure to Germany. He “removed” people like homosexuals, communists, Africans, Slavic people, socialists, and the disabled. Hitler placed the blame of World War I on them and placed them in concentration camps as a “removal” from society. Many deemed as they deserve to be place and sent to the concentration camps because of Hitler made them to believe it was their fault that the war was taken place.
    2. When Murrow and the American troops arrive to Buchenwald the conditions were brutal. That were results of 1,200 men in a stable that was meant for 80 horses and caused a horrible odor in their living areas. Murrow then discovered there were he once knew and recognized but now don’t because of the camp’s harsh conditions. He went on to describe them as the “living dead”; they were good as dead while they were in the camp. He was mostly shocked that how the majority of the people does not know what were the conditions to that camps are like and how the villages in Germany are strangely well-dressed and well-fed as if they have not gone through the war. But what shocked me the most was that people who are going to the camps are convinced they deserve to go the camps but without the full knowledge of what the camps itself are like.
    3. When Murrow delivered this line as if he was disgusted. He was disgusted because how many people are so unaware of the camp’s conditions. Murrow was also disgusted how people would force others to go through these conditions just for a “better Germany”. But he did also sound noble as he shared his discovery of his accounts and the horribleness of the concentration camps that have killed over eleven million people.
    4. Murrow argues the people like the ones in the concentration camp does not deserve nor should ever deserve the cruelty of Hitler’s Final Solution and the conditions of the camps are much worse than the people know it to be. He wants those who are listening to feel remorse and to understand the full truth of what really happens at the concentration camps. He wants the listeners to understand the ones that have to go through the camps for the reasons they can’t change or were born with and it was unfair. I think he did achieve his goal; because the way he delivered his message made it seemed he was telling the whole truth and he was but the way he told it; it made the listeners believed him and felt remorse.

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  43. 1) The Nuremberg Laws ultimately led to the final solution.The Nuremberg Laws were a collection of anti-Semitic laws that restricted the rights of the Jewish people. The establishment of the ghettos also led to the final solution. The ghettos were often crowed and it represented bad living conditions. The establishment of concentration camps helped contribute to final solution. The concentration camps was used to starve out the prisoners, most prisoners were Jews. The result of concentration camps between 1933 and 1945 was the death of almost 3.5 million people. The final solution was the idea to build extermination camps to exterminate the Jewish population.
    2) The conditions when Murrow and the American troops arrive at Buchenwald was horrible. There was people laying on the floor, starving people, and the concentration camp was crowded. Murrow stated that men tried to lift him to their shoulders. Murrow also stated that there were about 1200 men in that barrack and people were packed in the bunks in fives. The thing that shocked Murrow was the fact that the concentration camp was filled with dying people and the living conditions were terrible. The thing that shocked me about Murrow’s description was how crowded the barrack was, and how small the barrack was.
    3) When Murrow stated “If I have offended you by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, I’m not in the least sorry”, he is trying to say that the living condition at Buchenwald was so bad that Murrow didn’t care if you were mad about how the people were treated at the camps. When Murrow delivers this line his tone is serious, and depressed.
    4) Murrow is trying to make an argument that the concentration camp had a more negative impact on people that what it actually seems. Murrow wants the listeners to feel how it was like to live in a concentration camp. Murrow wants the listeners to learn that concentration camps was not how it seemed, and how bad the living conditions were. I think that Murrow achieved his goal because he documented the emotions of the people who were at the concentration camps and he described the life of the people at the concentration camps.

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  44. After World War I, Germany was blamed and held accountable for this event and was required to pay reparations in the aftermath of World War 1. One of many events that led to the creation of the Final solution was laws know as Nuremburg Laws passed in 1935, which restricted many rights for Jewish people such as prohibiting Jews from working as doctors, lawyers, or journalist. Some other events following Nuremburg Laws was the Nazis widespread use of programs called Kristallnacht, intended to kill Jews, Jewish synagogues and Jewish businesses. After the horrific events in which the Nazis used on Jews and other groups of people it eventually made the act of discrimination normal because of the violence used, it then influenced ideas on discrimination.
    When Murrow and the American troops arrived to Buchwald it was a filthy environment in which there was an abundance of dead bodies scattered around the concentration camp. The conditions in which the Jews were living in can be characterized as harsh, they were given little amount of food, clothing, and wasn’t treated as humans. Murrow encountered multiple people from different walks of life and from many different professions such as many different children and adult prisoners of the camp, doctors, and professors. I would have to say that the smell of death and the thousands of lives he learned about who were suffering is what shocked Murrow’s experience in the camp. What shocked me the most about this was the will and motivation the prisoners had to have in order to survive. It is amazing how these prisoners continue to endure the harsh conditions and to live knowing that they are on the verge of encountering death.
    Murrow is not sorry for describing the mild account of Buchenwald and doesn’t care if he offended the audience because as his job he is to report the conditions and the facts on the topic he is covering. His tone is angry because he talks in a serious manner and seems to be irritated from his encounter at Buchenwald.
    Through his account his argument he is trying to make is too show people of the German race and other races throughout the world the conditions the prisoners have to endure and to show the world the millions of innocent lives who die in the camps. Murrow wants the audience to feel remorse for the prisoners n the camps. I think he achieved his goal through his work because he as a reporter has covered the story of concentration camps and have provided his best insight and first hand account of his experience at Buchenwald.

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    • I agree with you that Murrow seemed irritated by the fact that people could possible be offended with what he was saying. He was telling the truth as he saw it, which was his job and he was offended that people would be offended by the fact that he was doing his job.

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  45. After his rise to power, Hitler began to blame the Jewish people on on Germany’s problems at the time. Germans were desperate due to the country’s recession, and believed Hitler’s promises of a stronger Germany. Later, discriminatory legislation allowed for open hatred of certain peoples.
    Buchenwald was overcrowded and low on food and other supplies for prisoners. Murrow encountered prisoners who were just normal people being captured, such as teachers, doctors, and even tourists. He seemed most shocked by the physical condition of everyone in the camps, as he frequently described their appearance. What was most jarring to me was the amount of corpses in the crematorium.
    Murrow wanted people to hear about the atrocities committed at Buchenwald, no matter how grotesque and horrific they might be. It is also apparent that he was disturbed by what he saw in Buchenwald. To convince the audience, he not only tells of the conditions, but also makes it relateable to listeners at home by talking about the prisoners past as everyday people before being brought to the camp.

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  46. 1) Germany after world war one was left in such a poor state that a man like Hitler could rise to power and convince many Germans to place their blame on the Jewish people as well as other “undesirables”. This lead to the popularity of Nazism. The first step to concentration camps were the Nuremberg Laws that separated the Jewish people and labeled them as other. The wide spread use of concentration camps to get rid of these “undesirables” came shortly after this and the night of broken glass.
    2) Buchenwald is described as dilapidated from the out side as well as the people with in. Murrow repeatedly describes the awful smell that came from the thousands of prisoners both alive and dead all crammed in one space. By the time the American troops arrived the prisoners were living five to a bunk and hundreds if not thousands of them were too weak to walk. The people with the camps come from all across Europe and every last one of them is described as looking beaten down and severely underfeed. I think what shocked Murrow the most the stacks of bodies in the crematory, I think he was surprised to find how beaten the dead were and how the dead was literally skin and bones. I found the treat of the kids to be most surprising, kids are young and can be taught so it always surprises me that the Nazis take and mistreat children who have no clue about they are being targeted.
    3) When Murrow says “If I have offended you by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, I’m not in the least sorry”, he is saying he does not regret telling people of the conditions of one these concentration camps> I think he says this to ensure that the Holocaust will be remember and not sweat under the rug or viewed as not that bad. Murrow says these words in a rather forceful way, but it also sounds kind of sad like he is deeply depressed to have to say them at all.
    4) As a journalist Murrow is trying to argue that the concentration camp were deplorable, he is arguing that they are two times worse then what everyone thinks. He wants his reads to feel and what is was like in these camps. He wants the people to understand the severity of the camps. I think he achieves these goals, i believe people listening to this report would have learned if only a sliver what is was like to part of the living dead kept in concentration camps. His words had an impact on me and I’m sure they effected many others as well, so in that sense he achieved his goal.

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  47. The start toward the normalization of the genocide that occurred was discrimination. The idea of discriminating against “lesser” people had to accepted by society before anything else took place. Next, people such as Jews and Africans and Jehovah’s Witnesses were placed and restricted to ghettos and the type of work they could do was restricted. Restricting one’s lifestyle puts them in a specific category making them easier to identify. These steps led to concentration and extermination camps. By this time, these camps were more likely to be accepted and normal within the community because of the small steps that had been taken before to led to these camps.

    According to Murrow, the concentration and extermination camps, such as Buchenwald, were severely sickening when the American troops arrived. Sans the German troops, the people were malnourished and in need of medical attention. The conditions were very uncomfortable in that there were twelve thousand people in a building that was meant to hold eighty horses. They were also unsanitary in that the bathrooms were a mess and it stank, which was probably due to the mixture of feces and body odor. The prisoners were hopeful at the sight of the soldiers because it meant that people were there to rescue them from Buchenwald. Murrow seemed to be the most shocked by how many people had died- due to a multitude of things- in this camp throughout the years. Buchenwald definitely lived up to its purpose in that it was a death trap. The large number of people who died a day was also very surprising to me. Murrow said that when the Polish had started coming to the camp, about nine hundred people could be known to die a day. That is a huge number, especially during that time period.

    At the end of the broadcast, Murrow seems to be sincere in his concern for these issues and for the conditions he saw. As he said in the radio broadcast, he truly didn’t seem the least bit concerned about offending anyone. He sounded as if he was trying his best to inform others of the situation, and gather sympathy from those who could make a difference or at least see to it that a event like this didn’t occur again. He doesn’t seem to emotional or choked up about the subject, but he is reporting what he saw to the best of his abilities, not trying to exaggerate or downplay the situation. For this, I respect him. He does argue that there are horrid conditions within the concentration camps though. He also says that American help is highly appreciated and is very beneficial in the war in Europe. He uses others’ comments to argue that the Americans and more specifically President Roosevelt, were very influential during the war. The Americas were to be looked at with pride because they were looked at with appreciation and envy all around the world. He reports the facts in favor of this argument. I do think that with this article and radio broadcast he stirred up nationalistic feeling within the United States. People in general like knowing they have done something morally right. People like being complimented on their good deeds, even if it wasn’t exactly their good deeds. Citizens of a country also like to be reassured that their country is a good, nice country to live in. For these reasons I believe his goal to stir up nationalistic feelings among Americans was achieved.

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  48. The Nazi Party deemed certain groups “inferior” or as a threat to their power. Discrimination of these groups increased with the passing of the “Nuremberg Laws” in 1935 which limited the freedoms and quality of life for Jews. Later on, the Nazi party organized a series of pogroms, or massacres against a particular ethnic group, and used the retaliation against of the killing of a German diplomat in justification of the killings. Many Jews were placed in ghettos, poorly maintained sectioned-off parts of a city, in order to separate Jews from Germans. Concentration camps then were used to remove Jews from areas where Germans lived and to work them to death. These actions normalized discrimination because it happened everyday and was justified by Nazi law.

    The conditions that Murrow saw at Buchenwald were horrible and inhumane. He encountered men that were too weak to get out of bed or even speak. I think Murray was shocked most by how the Germans in the surrounding countryside acted like nothing was happening, they lived life as usual and were all well fed while in that camp, prisoners were being overworked and died of starvation. What shocked me the most was the amount of food the prisoners received, I knew it was little, but not THAT LITTLE!

    I think Murray’s tone when he says that he isn’t sorry is very straightforward and unchanged. He says the word “mild” in a way that makes him seem to be thinking “If you think this is bad enough, you should’ve actually been there”.

    I think he is trying to make the audience feel sad, angry, and to look toward the future and make sure nothing like this ever happens again. He’s trying to argue that this was wrong and that it shouldn’t ever happen again.

    I think he achieved his goal because his account of his findings, like many others, was published officially for others to learn from it. If he didn’t touch any other person, he at least touched me. His account gave my a deeper understanding of what happened inside those death camps and has truly impacted me.

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  49. 1. In 1933 the Nazis took power of Germany. They did this by feeding off of the fact that Germany was left weak after WWI and that the German people were desperate for a leader who could promise to return them to their former glory. Starting in 1935, the Nuremberg Laws were put in place. These laws were designed to take away rights from Jews living under German control. Three years later, on November 9th, Jews were attacked and killed on what became known as Krystallnacht. Soon ghettos that housed Jews were created, beginning in 1939. From there, Jews were moved into concentration camps, where they would be worked to death. Over time, this led to the Final Solution. The Final Solution was a plan to exterminate all Jewish people in German territory and to do so extermination camps were established. The purpose of these actions was to rid Germany of any “unwanted” groups and to impose German superiority over those inferior to them. These actions were considered normal because Jews, as well as other targeted groups, weren’t seen has humans. They were less than, an “inferior” species, and could be treated as such.

    2. Conditions in Buchenwald were horrid. The people living there were described as the “living dead” by Murrow. At times, the conditions were so horrible that Murrow couldn’t bring himself to describe them. The people who were living there were shown no decency and they were treated like animals. When Murrow entered the camp, all of the men he met were weak from exhaustion and starvation. Inside, he met men who had been doctors, professors, and even a mayor. I think what shocked Murrow the most was how the people living in the camp were treated. They were so overworked and so emaciated that to Murrow they were already dead. This shocked Murrow considering how well the guards were living and how “pleasing to the eye” the surrounding scenery was. The thing that shocked me the most was the fact that Murrow chose not to include details about Buchenwald and that there were worse things that he encountered that day.

    3. When Murrow says “if [he] has offended [them] by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, [he’s] not in the least bit sorry” he sounds, for a lack of a better term, unapologetic. He doesn’t care if anyone is offended by what they heard, and actually, he himself seems kind of offended that that would even be possible. What he is saying is the truth and so how could anyone be offended by the truth? That is the attitude he has when he delivers this line.

    4. In this report he is trying to make people aware of what horrors occurred at Buchenwald. He is arguing that the people in these camps did not deserve that kind of treatment and he is trying to make it so nothing like this ever happens again. He wants his listeners to feel pain and horror for the people inside those camps. He is trying to get his audience to sympathize with those in Buchenwald that he is describing. I think he achieved his goal because he keeps the focus on the people in the camp and the things they went through. He doesn’t divert attention to talk about the politics behind it and the limited times he talks about the guards he brings it back the prisoners and what they went through. Also, by not describing in full detail what he saw, and by telling people that it was much worse than what he’s saying, the audience’s minds begin to wander. They would begin to think of the atrocities that happened that were too horrible to retell and that would elicit even more of a emotional response because they would feel connected to the story.

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  50. The Holocaust blamed mainly the Jewish population for any instability in the Nazi regime. They were inferior to the Nazis, and therefore were of no good use to the country according to the Nazis. The final solution was a plan to kill all the Jews in Europe. The creation of industrialized extermination camps like Auschwitz and other proceeded. He described the camp as smelling really bad and strongly, the prisoners were wearing practically rags and looked very ill, and they were smiling with their eyes. While the Germans in charge were very well fed, everyone else was given very small rations, making them starve to death. The conditions were still very bad when people from other countries arrived, the hospitals were full and the food was still very little. I think Murrow was shocked the most at the amount of people that died on a daily basis and how normal it was for everyone there. To me the conditions that the Germans made the prisoners live in is shocking, how they could put another human being in an environment and make them go through such terrible things. At the end of the broadcast you could clearly tell that he was very mad and could not believe what was happening and that no one was doing anything about it. Murrow wants his audience to feel bad that they are partially letting all of this go on. He wants them to realize the harm they are doing to innocent people and he wants them to take action. I believe he was able to influence many to go and fight for doing the right thing.

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