Mongol DBQ: Materials and Instructions

Hey guys!

Remember, your DBQ on the Mongols is due at the start of class tomorrow.  It should be:

  • Handwritten and legible (skip lines if you need to)
  • Written in pen
  • Organized and thoughtful
  • Fully compliant with the DBQ Rubric Checklist (you got a copy of this in class, but if you’ve lost it, that link will lead you to another copy).

If you’ve misplaced your documents for the DBQ, or just need a clean copy for note-taking, here it is: Mongol Document-Based Question Resources.

You may also find it useful to rewatch the Crash Course video embedded below:

Good luck, and remember that learning to write an effective DBQ is a process which is going to take several tries– so just do your best, and remember that we’ll have lots of chances for you to improve.

 

 

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CCOT Make-Up Schedule!

If you missed yesterday’s CCOT essay due to the AP Psychology exam, you need to fill out this form in order to schedule your make-up essay.  The only days I will be offering the make-up essay are those listed on this form.

 

Bonus Film Opportunity: Third Time’s the Charm!

Are your essay grades less than desirable? Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel assignment by May 16th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above. Poor quality work will be graded as such. This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all of the films listed below:

Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India, dir. Ashutosh Gowariker (2001)

Paths of Glory, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1957)

Modern Times, dir. Charles Chaplin (1936)

***NOTE: This is a silent film. I know. You’ll live.

Casablanca, dir. Michael Curtiz (1942)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1964)

Charlie Wilson’s War, dir. Mike Nichols (2007)

Bonus Film Opportunity!

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: Movies in World History assignment by Friday, April 22nd!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.  Be aware that some of the selections below contain adult material, and that you should make your selections with the approval of your parent or guardian.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all most of the films:

The Young Victoria (2009), dir. Jean-Marc Vallee

Jodhaa Akbar (2008), dir. Ashutosh Gowariker

Last of the Mohicans (1992), dir. Micheal Mann

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003), dir. Peter Weir

Seven Samurai (1954), dir. Akira Kurosawa

Amistad (1997), dir. Steven Speilberg

 Have fun!

Homework: CCOT Practice

This evening, you’ll need to complete the CCOT outline we began in class on the following prompt:

Using the music video below, analyze the changes and continuities of Western popular music between the the 11th century CE and the present.

This exercise is primarily designed to help you better understand the format of Change and Continuity essays, so I anticipate you being a little creative with this response.

Homework: Tokugawa Edicts!

Tonight, please read the two selections from the Tokugawa Edicts located below:

You will note that there are four questions following each of the passages; please fully answer the questions on a separate sheet of paper.  They will be due at the start of class tomorrow.


 

Additionally, please be aware that you’ve got several things coming due relatively shortly:

  • In-class DBQ (Friday, March 11th)
  • Source Scavenger Hunt (Thursday, March 24th)
  • Black Death DBQ Rewrite (Thursday, March 24th)
  • Renaissance and Reformation WebQuest (Friday, March 18th)
  • Unit Four Test (Friday, March 18th)
  • In-class DBQ (Friday, March 25th)

For your Black Death DBQ rewrite, you will want to use the Black Death DBQ documents.  Remember that you should take the comments you received on your first DBQ to heart, and try to avoid making the same mistakes a second time.

DBQ Prep: Sample Essay Scores!

Hopefully, by this point you have read, annotated, and scored the two sample essays included in the packet you picked up on Friday.  It’s time now to see how accurate you were in your assessment, so get out the essays and your scores, and let’s see what the College Board says:

Sample 1A — Score: 8

The thesis outlines factors shaping the modern Olympics and correctly places them in the relevant historical context of the time period (1 point). There are four groupings: peace, political interests, economic interests (“incentive for sponsoring as well as hosting the games”), and social reform (female athletes) (1 point). The essay demonstrates understanding of all 10 documents (1 point) and correctly uses evidence from 9 documents to answer the question (2 points). Document 5 is inverted, expressing the effects of the Olympics on Japan, and therefore did not count for evidence of factors that affected the Olympics. There is analysis of point of view for three documents (Documents 4, 6, and 10) (1 point). The request for additional documents from people who were not athletes or people from Africa and South America shows awareness of other factors that could have affected the Olympics in the time period (1 point). An expanded core point was earned for additional analysis of documents through groupings and of point of view (1 point).

Sample 1C — Score: 4

The thesis identifies three factors that shaped the modern Olympic movement: “nationalism,” “host country to show off,” and “feminism” (1 point). There are three document groupings: peace (Documents 1 and 6), nationalism (Documents 3, 4, and 10), and feminism (Documents 2 and 8) (1 point). The essay demonstrates understanding of all 10 documents (1 point). No points were awarded for evidence because the documents are used to support the inverse of the question, i.e., how the Olympics had consequences or effects. There is analysis of point of view for three documents (Documents 3, 4, and 7) (1 point). No point was earned for the request of an additional document because the explanation of how the requested documents would help assess a factor that shaped the modern Olympics is incomplete.

So.  How accurate were you?  Don’t forget to quickly explain any discrepancy between your original score and the one assessed by the College Board!

Homework: DBQ Preparation!

Happy Friday, folks!  While I don’t want to rain on your parade, I’m afraid I have to remind you that you have your very first document-based question scheduled for next Monday (February 29th).  We’ll be doing this as a timed essay, so you will not be receiving the prompt in advance– instead, I’m going to ask that you do a different type of preparation in advance of the coming DBQ.

Today in class you should have picked up the annotated rubric for the 2008 released DBQ from the College Board exam, as well as two sample student essays.  (This is the same essay which you outlined for me on Wednesday night.)  You’ll need your DBQ documents out in order to complete this assignment– if you’ve lost them, you can download another copy from the link in the post from Wednesday, February 24th.

Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Carefully read over the annotated rubric.  Make sure you fully understand what you can and can’t give points for before you start reading the essays.
  2. Read and annotate each essay.  You may find it useful to highlight or underline the thesis, POV analysis, additional documents, grouping, and evidence.
  3. Use the rubric to decide on a score, from 1 to 9, for both essays.
  4. Then, on a separate sheet of paper, briefly write an explanation for your score for each essay.  What points did each earn? Why didn’t you give them certain points?  (Bullet points are fine for this.)
  5. Check the class blog on Sunday afternoon.  I will schedule a post to go live at 12:00 PM with the information on how each essay was actually scored.  Compare your score to the official score and write a brief statement explaining why your score differed (if it did) from the official score.
  6. Be prepared to turn in your score analysis sheet at the start of class on Monday!

NOTE: First and second periods, I told you that you would also need to analyze your own DBQ outline and give it a grade– and you’re still welcome to do so!– however, I forgot to give third period back their outlines, so that part of the assignment will not be required. 🙂

Have a good weekend, guys, and I’ll see you on Monday!

DBQ Practice!

Sorry for the late post, guys! I had to cover a class during my planning period and then had a meeting after school, so this is the first chance I’ve had to put up this post.

Tonight for homework, please complete the  DBQ Essay Worksheet, using the prompt and documents from the Olympic DBQ which you received in class.  This assignment will be due at the start of class tomorrow, and you can expect it to take you a fair amount of time to complete.  (The first AP-style DBQ is always difficult to put together; I promise it will get much, much easier with practice.)

If you missed our discussion of how to write a DBQ, or if you want to review the process or receive some extra help on the subject, please check the Document-Based Question page under the Essay Writing Resources tab on this page.  You’ll find a number of instructional videos and additional downloads which may help to clarify the process.  It would also be a good idea to come and talk to me to clear up any questions you have on the process before next Monday– we’ll be writing our first full DBQ at the start of class on February 29th.

Additionally, remember that you need to budget time during the remainder of the week to complete quiz corrections on the Unit Three reading quiz.  And– THIS IS IMPORTANT– I goofed on when I told you they would be due! I think I told all three classes that your corrections would be due on Tuesday, March 1st (the day of our next test).  However, my policy is to give you five class days to complete corrections, which would mean that corrections should be due on the second of March, not the first!  Sorry about that, guys.  I’ll address my mistake tomorrow in class.

Homework: The Question of Mongol Awesomeness.

I know I don’t need to remind you, but: you’ve got an in-class comparative essay tomorrow.  We’ll do it the first 40 minutes of class, so make sure you’re (a) present, and (b) not late.  I would suggest reviewing the following materials:

  • Mongol Documents (from today’s activity)
  • Southernization
  • Your article on the spread of Islam (check the homework for this unit to find it up on this blog)

You could also watch this Crash Course video!

And this one:

You MIGHT find that the topic has something to do with trade. And religions.  So.

Now.  On to today’s homework: after reading the above Mongol documents thoroughly and discussing them in your groups today, please respond to the following prompt on a separate sheet of paper (YOU DO NOT NEED TO DO BLOG COMMENTS THIS TIME):

Were the Mongols a beneficial force for Eurasia during the Post-Classical era?  Why or why not?  Provide five reasons– supported by evidence from your readings– to justify your answer.

Happy mongol-ing, and I’ll see you tomorrow!

 

Bonus Film Reviews: Third Time’s the Charm

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: AP World History on Film assignment by December 16th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all of the films listed below:

Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India, dir. Ashutosh Gowariker (2001)

Paths of Glory, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1957)

A Very Long Engagement [Un long dimanche de fiançailles], dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet (2004)

***NOTE: This film is rated R for violence and sexuality.  If your parent or guardian would object to you viewing this film, please move along to another option.

Modern Times, dir. Charles Chaplin (1936)

***NOTE: This is a silent film.  I know.  You’ll live.

Casablanca, dir. Michael Curtiz (1942)

The Last King of Scotland, dir. Kevin Macdonald (2006)

***NOTE: This film is rated R for language, violence, and sexuality.  If your parent or guardian would object to you viewing this film, please move along to another option.

Happy viewing!

Happy Thanksgiving! (And also, you have some work to do. Sorry.)

Congratulations, guys– you made it to Thanksgiving.  Take some time over the next week to relax, enjoy time with your family and friends, and eat some pies.

However.

We’re getting awfully close to the end of the semester (only three more weeks when we get back!), which means you’ve got some work to complete over the break.  So here’s what you need to do during your break:

  1. Complete the CCOT Worksheet using the prompt from the 2015 AP World History exam.  (For those of you who were absent on Friday, please check your email– I’ll send it to you.  You should also review how to write a Change and Continuity essay by looking at the Essay Writing Materials section of this website.)
  2. Read, annotate, and grade one of the three released student sample essays from the 2015 CCOT essay.  (Again, those of you who were absent, please check your email.)  We’ll talk about how you graded the essays when we get back on Monday, November 30th.
  3. Read for this unit! (Basically: finish the book.  Your reading quiz will be on December 3rd.)
  4. Work on your Content Paper.  It’s due on December 1st.
  5. Start working on the Student Learning Objective Review.  Remember, your Student Learning Objective (SLO) exam will make up 10% of your final grade, and will take place on December 11th.

So that’s what you need to be up to date for the next week.  Take care, have fun, and I’ll see you on the 30th.

 

(And just a reminder– I’m going to be out in the hinterlands starting on Sunday, so I make no guarantees about my availability via email.  If you need to get in contact with me for any reason, I may not respond until Saturday, November 28th.)

Homework: Imperialism, the Opium Wars, and China

Thanks so much for your thoughtful participation in our discussion on terror, extremism, and the events in Beirut and Paris today, guys– I know that it took us a bit off-book, but I do think that it’s important to give you guys a space for discussion and analysis when we have events like this.  If you’re interested, I’ll link to the full articles we read today at the bottom of this entry.  And if you’d like to add your own resources, feel free to drop relevant links in the comments for this entry.  I certainly don’t mind if you continue our discussion from today in the comments on this blog– just remember to keep it civil, keep it rational, and post thoughtfully.

Now.  On to the meat of the issue: since we went off-book today,  I need to ask you to cover some content so that we’ll still be on pace for the unit.  I’ll be doing some reconfiguring of my lesson plans tonight, too, so if you’ll do this for me, I’ll do the heavy  lifting tomorrow and Wednesday.

Tonight, please download the following chart (Imperialism in East Asia Cause and Effect Chart), and then use the Imperialism, Opium, and China PowerPoint and your textbook to complete the chart.  We’ll discuss it tomorrow at the start of class, before jumping into a discussion of nationalism (which actually connect rather well to some of the things you read about today, honestly).

Also, remember that your Content Paper is due December 1st, so keep that in the back of your minds.


 

Materials from today’s discussion:

If you have other materials you would like to add to this list, please feel free to link to them in the comments below.

 

Homework: Russian Empire Work (Also, DBQ Rewrite Information)!

Apologies for not being terribly entertaining today, guys.  I’m feeling pretty rotten.  And alas, that means you’ve going to be responsible for this information through independent work.  Tonight, you need to finish up the following assignments using your textbooks (if you didn’t finish them in class):

  1. Imperial Russia Organizer— Please complete a PERSIA analysis of both the reigns of Ivan IV (the Terrible) and Peter the Great.  Be sure to note the causes of change or continuity in the arrows between each ruler.
  2. Caribbean Slavery vs Serfdom— Coercive and forced labor forms become increasingly important during this unit, so you’ll need to complete this compare-and-contrast worksheet to help you understand the similarities and differences in labor systems.  Don’t forget to write a comparative thesis statement as part of this assignment.  (Also: I won’t say anything in class, but this would make a really great comparative essay topic.  Gosh.)
  3. Peter the Great: Correspondence with His Son— And finally, please read the associated letter from Peter the Great to his son, Alexei, on the topic of absolutism and power.  There’s one analytical question on this exchange which you will need to answer on a separate sheet of paper.

If you need further information on Ivan IV and Peter the Great, or if you’re just fascinated by Imperial Russia in general, you might consider watching the documentary below:

Now!  As to your DBQ rewrite.  Remember, you are not required to rewrite your Black Death DBQ– but many of you probably would like.  If you would, your rewrite will be due at the start of class on October 29th.  If you have lost your documents for this DBQ, you can download another copy here: Black Death DBQ.

Homework: Final Paper Topic Selection!

As we discussed in class today, we’re going to begin working on a final research project which will require you to do a significant about of work with primary sources in order to get a better feel for the historical position of someone involved in a significant event or moment of human history.  You received the handout describing the process we’ll be going through for the rest of the semester, and you should read it carefully.  If you’ve misplaced yours, you can download a new copy here (Final Research Project: Topics and Instructions).  You can also find a full description of the project on the Talking About History: Final Research Project page on this website.

(In order to get to the Talking About History page, look at the drop-down menu at the top of this page.  Hover over “AP World History WebQuests and Projects” and you’ll see the page and all of it’s related materials at the bottom of the drop-down menu.  It wouldn’t be a bad idea to peruse all of the pages associated with the assignment in order to get a feel for how this project will progress.)

For homework this weekend you will choose topics you would be interested in selecting for your research project.  I suggest you review the available topics on the instruction sheet and do some quick Googling to see what your options and preferences might be.  You will make your selections via a Google form which you can access on the Topic Selection page.

The Topic Selection form will go live at 12:00 PM EST (noon) on Saturday, October 10th.  You MUST have completed your selections by 8:00 AM EST on Monday, October 8th.

Remember, topics will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.  I want you all doing unique projects, so if you really have your heart set on a particular topic, make sure you fill out the form early!  If you fail to complete the form, I will assign you whatever topics are left.