Latin American Revolutions!

If you need more materials to finish up your work on Latin American revolutions, please watch the Crash Course video below, and review the notes I’ve linked to:

Latin American Revolutions

See you tomorrow, and we’ll start off by talking about your… beautiful… cities that you created today.

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Classwork: Latin American Revolutions!

Using the handout you received at the start of class, please analyze the causes, participants, main events, and long-term effects of the Latin American revolutions in Mexico (1810), Spanish South America, and Brazil.  Your textbooks and the material below should help you to evaluate each revolutions– and don’t forget to note how well you think each revolution represents the ideals of the Enlightenment!

Latin American Revolutions PowerPoint

Also, the always-excellent Freeman-pedia has a really useful page on this subject: Latin American Independence!  I strongly suggest you check it out.

You should be ready to hand in your worksheet tomorrow at the start of class– I will (very quickly!) check it for completion and major errors, and will return it to you so that you can study from it as we get closer to the Unit Five Test.

Homework: CCOT Practice

This evening, you’ll need to complete the CCOT outline we began in class on the following prompt:

Using the music video below, analyze the changes and continuities of Western popular music between the the 11th century CE and the present.

This exercise is primarily designed to help you better understand the format of Change and Continuity essays, so I anticipate you being a little creative with this response.

Homework: Imperialism, the Opium Wars, and China

Thanks so much for your thoughtful participation in our discussion on terror, extremism, and the events in Beirut and Paris today, guys– I know that it took us a bit off-book, but I do think that it’s important to give you guys a space for discussion and analysis when we have events like this.  If you’re interested, I’ll link to the full articles we read today at the bottom of this entry.  And if you’d like to add your own resources, feel free to drop relevant links in the comments for this entry.  I certainly don’t mind if you continue our discussion from today in the comments on this blog– just remember to keep it civil, keep it rational, and post thoughtfully.

Now.  On to the meat of the issue: since we went off-book today,  I need to ask you to cover some content so that we’ll still be on pace for the unit.  I’ll be doing some reconfiguring of my lesson plans tonight, too, so if you’ll do this for me, I’ll do the heavy  lifting tomorrow and Wednesday.

Tonight, please download the following chart (Imperialism in East Asia Cause and Effect Chart), and then use the Imperialism, Opium, and China PowerPoint and your textbook to complete the chart.  We’ll discuss it tomorrow at the start of class, before jumping into a discussion of nationalism (which actually connect rather well to some of the things you read about today, honestly).

Also, remember that your Content Paper is due December 1st, so keep that in the back of your minds.


 

Materials from today’s discussion:

If you have other materials you would like to add to this list, please feel free to link to them in the comments below.

 

Homework: Urbanization Game Redux

So today in class we played the Urbanization Game, which hopefully allowed you to see just how incredibly chaotic and rapid the pace of change was during the 18th and 19th centuries.  If your city was anything like most other groups’ cities, it was cramped, poorly-planned, and probably a really dangerous and unpleasant place to live.  And that really isn’t an unfair categorization of most cities during this era: most were deeply unpleasant places to live, especially if you were part of the working class.

Therefore, your homework tonight is to reflect on the city you built in class today, its problems, and what you might be able to do in order to improve things.  To that end, you will take a sheet of paper (notebook paper is fine, but if you want to make yours pretty, that’s fine) and design a better industrial city.  The city you draw must contain the following:

  • 1 river
  • at least 50 trees
  • 70 houses
  • 50 tenements
  • 15 estates
  • at least 15 stores
  • at least 5 churches
  • 12 public houses (pubs)
  • at least 5 hospitals
  • 25 factories (with smoke)
  • 5 coal mines
  • 7 schools
  • 2 cemeteries
  • 2 jails
  • 1 theater
  • 1 music hall
  • 1 museum

You may draw in as many roads, bridges, railroads, and canals as you see fit.  Additionally, you might consider adding in municipal parks– green space for public use and enjoyment was a new idea in the 19th century, and the first public park will be designed in Liverpool, England in 1843.  Your goal is to design a city which would work– a place that is safe, pleasant, efficient, productive, and attractive.

When you have finished designing your new and improved city, please answer the following questions on a sheet of paper:

  1. How would you describe the city your group created in class?  What were some of the biggest problems you noticed about your first city?
  2. How is your new city design different from what you designed in class?  Describe how it is organized.  Why did you choose this design?  Do you think this sort of city design would work in real life?  Why or why not?

Don’t forget– you’ll be writing me another in-class DBQ during the first part of class tomorrow, so it might be a good idea to look over your notes on how to write one tonight.

19th Century Migrations: Classwork for November 10th

Hello, lovely students!  I hope everything went smoothly today with your substitute– remember, all of your work is due at the start of class tomorrow.  If, for some unknown reason, you didn’t finish gathering all of the material you needed from the signs up around the room, please check the file located below.

Nineteenth Century Migration Placards

That should be all you need to finish your work.  Also, remember that your Unit Five Vocabulary is due at the start of class tomorrow, and we’ll begin class with your Unit Five reading quiz.

See you soon!

Latin American Revolutions Homework and Due Dates!

All right, guys– I know it’s been nothin’ but revolutions this week, but you’ve got one more.  Or rather, a series of revolutions.  What you need to do is get out your Latin American Revolution handout from class (or download another copy here: The Age of Revolutions in Latin America), and complete it using the Crash Course video located below, your textbooks, and the notes from this PowerPoint: Latin American Revolutions.


Now, on to due dates.  Big dates coming up that you should keep track of:

  • Annotated Bibliography (Monday, November 9th)
  • Unit Five Reading Quiz (Wednesday, November 11th)
  • Unit Five Vocabulary Assignment (Wednesday, November 11th)
  • In-Class DBQ (Thursday, November 12th)
  • Second Film Review (Friday, November 13th)
  • Industrial Revolution WebQuest Due (Thursday, November 19th)
  • Unit Five Test (Thursday, November 19th)

Additionally, remember that we’ll be in the Media Center tomorrow for a WebQuest, and I’ll be absent on Tuesday of next week for Model UN.  (You’ll have a lot of work in my absence, so try not to get too excited.)  Also, I’ll be teaching you how to write the third and final type of essay for this course on the 20th, so if you know you’re going to be absent that day in advance of Thanksgiving break, please let me know so that we can make arrangements.

Homework: Final Paper Topic Selection!

As we discussed in class today, we’re going to begin working on a final research project which will require you to do a significant about of work with primary sources in order to get a better feel for the historical position of someone involved in a significant event or moment of human history.  You received the handout describing the process we’ll be going through for the rest of the semester, and you should read it carefully.  If you’ve misplaced yours, you can download a new copy here (Final Research Project: Topics and Instructions).  You can also find a full description of the project on the Talking About History: Final Research Project page on this website.

(In order to get to the Talking About History page, look at the drop-down menu at the top of this page.  Hover over “AP World History WebQuests and Projects” and you’ll see the page and all of it’s related materials at the bottom of the drop-down menu.  It wouldn’t be a bad idea to peruse all of the pages associated with the assignment in order to get a feel for how this project will progress.)

For homework this weekend you will choose topics you would be interested in selecting for your research project.  I suggest you review the available topics on the instruction sheet and do some quick Googling to see what your options and preferences might be.  You will make your selections via a Google form which you can access on the Topic Selection page.

The Topic Selection form will go live at 12:00 PM EST (noon) on Saturday, October 10th.  You MUST have completed your selections by 8:00 AM EST on Monday, October 8th.

Remember, topics will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.  I want you all doing unique projects, so if you really have your heart set on a particular topic, make sure you fill out the form early!  If you fail to complete the form, I will assign you whatever topics are left.