You’ve got this.

Hey.  I know you’re nervous.  It’s okay.  You’ve got a high-pressure test tomorrow, and it’s probably weighing on you a little.  It’s all right to be anxious about things like this– but it’s also important to know how to handle that anxiety.

So, here: I made you a checklist, because sometimes it helps to have a tangible list of things to do when you’re nervous.  If you’re in class this semester, you already received a copy today.  If you took AP World last semester, you might want to download this, print it out, and read it over.  (And if you’re not one of my students– because I know there are some of you out there who read this who aren’t in my classes– feel free to take this advice and apply it to your own testing circumstance tomorrow.)

AP World History Exam Checklist

And because I think it’s important, and I think you guys probably need to hear this sometimes– especially in our current world of high-stakes testing– I’ll repeat what I said at the end of the checklist.

If there’s anything else you should know for tomorrow’s exam, it’s this: I’m so proud of you guys.  This is a hard class—it’s the history of everyone, everywhere, since the beginnings of humanity!  It couldn’t be anything BUT hard.  But you’ve handled this semester with grace, perseverance, curiosity, enthusiasm, and grit.  You’ve already proven yourselves to me; I don’t need the College Board to tell me whether or not you know this stuff.  This is three hours out of your life, with seventy questions and three essays.  It can’t possibly tell me—or anyone else—about your sense of historical empathy, your ability use historical precedents in your personal decision-making, or your value as a person.

So go in there tomorrow and kick butt on the exam, because I know you can.  But remember when the scores come back in July that you’re not a better person for scoring a five, or a worse person for scoring a two.  (I think you’re awesome regardless.)  The only thing that really matters is what you DO with the information you gain in this or any other class, and you can do so very, very much more than take a test.

So there you go.  Go forth and conquer.

Buena suerte, bon chance, and good luck!

 

Advertisements

Homework: Zaption on Tiananmen Square Massacre

Hey guys, check this space by about 5:30– I should be able to have the video posted by then.  Sorry! I’m at the practice exam right now.

All good.  Here’s the Zaption, guys:

The Tank Man

And if you’re interested in watching the full documentary (which is excellent), you can check it out here.

CCOT Make-Up Schedule!

If you missed yesterday’s CCOT essay due to the AP Psychology exam, you need to fill out this form in order to schedule your make-up essay.  The only days I will be offering the make-up essay are those listed on this form.

 

Homework: World War II and the Holocaust

CHANGE IN PLANS, FOLKS– MAKE SURE TO READ THIS:

Hey, there.  Since our schedule today (and for the next few days) is rather messed up, second period doesn’t have much time in class to work on their infographic, which means they’ll need to focus on that for their homework tonight (5/2).  Thus, I would like you to complete the assignment below by the start of class on WEDNESDAY (5/4), rather than the start of class tomorrow (5/3).  Sorry for the confusion, guys– I wish I’d known about the bell schedule for today in advance, but I didn’t. :/

This evening, please review the following material on the Holocaust (or Shoah) as a continuation of our study of World War II:

World War II and Society

After reviewing the material above, please listen to the following radio broadcast by journalist Edward R. Murrow on the liberation of Buchenwald in April of 1945. You will find that the sound quality is far from perfect– there are lots of hisses and pops and the whine of interference, as this is the actual recording from 1945. If you would like to, you can follow this transcript of the broadcast while you listen– but please do listen. Sometimes the tone of voice is just as important as the words themselves:

Liberation of Buchenwald, 15 April 1945, reported by Edward R. Murrow (CBS News)

In a thoughtful comment, please respond to the following prompts:

  • Describe the events in Germany beginning in 1933 which led to the Final Solution. What was their purpose? How did these actions normalize discrimination?
  • What were the conditions like in Buchenwald when Murrow and the American troops arrive? What sort of men did Murrow encounter in the camp? What do you think shocked Murrow the most about the experience? What shocked you the most about his description?
  • At the end of the broadcast, Murrow tells his audience that “if [he] has offended [them] by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, [he’s] not in the least bit sorry.” What is Murrow’s tone when he delivers this line? (That is, how does he sound?)
  • Murrow, as a journalist, believed that it was his job to make an argument– NOT to be a mere reporter of facts. What argument is he trying to make through this report? What does he want his listeners to feel, learn, and believe as a result of his work? Do you think that he achieved his goal? Why or why not?

Remember, normal commenting rules apply: one thoughtful comment which addresses all of the discussion points thoroughly will receive up to 95%, while you must comment and leave a response on someone else’s comment in order to earn full credit.

Bonus Film Opportunity: Third Time’s the Charm!

Are your essay grades less than desirable? Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel assignment by May 16th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above. Poor quality work will be graded as such. This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all of the films listed below:

Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India, dir. Ashutosh Gowariker (2001)

Paths of Glory, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1957)

Modern Times, dir. Charles Chaplin (1936)

***NOTE: This is a silent film. I know. You’ll live.

Casablanca, dir. Michael Curtiz (1942)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1964)

Charlie Wilson’s War, dir. Mike Nichols (2007)

Suggestions for Tomorrow’s CCOT Essay

Don’t forget that you’ll have a CCOT essay tomorrow in class.  If I were you, I would consider the following:

1. Unit Four.
2. Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and one other place I’m not giving away.
3. Trade.

Also, the word “interregional” is interesting, isn’t it?  I wonder what it means.

Homework: Zaption on 20th Century Peace Movments

We’ve been all about war this unit, and that can’t be healthy.  So please watch the following Zaption and answer the associated questions.  If you have tech difficulties with this Zaption, please try to let me know by about 6:00 PM tonight.

Zaption: Peace Movements in the 20th Century

And  because we were discussing this in third period today, take a gander at the Chinese government’s recent video proposing their new, awesome, Five Year Plan!  (Yes.  Yes, they still have Five Year Plans.  And this video is INSANE.)

Homework: The Holocaust

This weekend, please review the following material on the Holocaust (or Shoah) as a continuation of our study of World War II:

World War II and Society

After reviewing the material above, please listen to the following radio broadcast by journalist Edward R. Murrow on the liberation of Buchenwald in April of 1945.  You will find that the sound quality is far from perfect– there are lots of hisses and pops and the whine of interference, as this is the actual recording from 1945.  If you would like to, you can follow this transcript of the broadcast while you listen– but please do listen.  Sometimes the tone of voice is just as important as the words themselves:

Liberation of Buchenwald, 15 April 1945, reported by Edward R. Murrow (CBS News)

In a thoughtful comment, please respond to the following prompts:

  1. Describe the events in Germany beginning in 1933 which led to the Final Solution.  What was their purpose?  How did these actions normalize discrimination?

  2. What were the conditions like in Buchenwald when Murrow and the American troops arrive?  What sort of men did Murrow encounter in the camp?  What do you think shocked Murrow the most about the experience?  What shocked you the most about his description?

  3. At the end of the broadcast, Murrow tells his audience that “if [he] has offended [them] by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, [he’s] not in the least bit sorry.”  What is Murrow’s tone when he delivers this line?  (That is, how does he sound?)

  4. Murrow, as a journalist, believed that it was his job to make an argument– NOT to be a mere reporter of facts.  What argument is he trying to make through this report?  What does he want his listeners to feel, learn, and believe as a result of his work?  Do you think that he achieved his goal?  Why or why not?

Remember, normal commenting rules apply: one thoughtful comment which addresses all of the discussion points thoroughly will receive up to 95%,  while you must comment and leave a response on someone else’s comment in order to earn full credit.

Try to get some rest this weekend, guys– we’ve got the final push coming up over the next two weeks.  Remember you have your Unit Six test on Thursday (12/10), and your Student Learning Objective exam on Friday (12/11), so let’s get ready to power through.

 

 

Classwork: Major Actions of World War II

Using your textbooks, the following notes, and the video below, work within your groups to create a poster which identifies and describes– through words or relevant images, symbols, maps, or designs– the following aspects of the Second World War:

  • One event you and your group members identify as the starting point of World War II– justify your choice
  • The three most important events from the European (and North African) theater of the war
  • The three most important events from the Pacific theater of the war
  • One event you and your group members identify as the end of World War II — justify your choice
  • One major social consequence of the conflict
  • One major economic consequence of the conflict
  • One major political consequence of the conflict
  • One way in which you think World War II is DIFFERENT from World War I
  • One way in which you thing World War II is SIMILAR from World War I

Make sure your poster is accurate, neat, and colorful!

Notes on the conflict: World War II

Good luck!

Homework: Discussing Fascism

All right, guys– you know the drill.  Today, you need to read Benito Mussolini’s excerpt from The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.  At the end of the excerpt, you’ll see the following questions:

  1. How did Mussolini view democracy, socialism, and pacifism?
  2. Why would Mussolini’s passionate embrace of heroism and violence appeal to so many Italians (and others) in the 1920s?

Respond to the questions in a comment below– and remember that normal commenting rules apply.  One good comment that fully addresses the questions will receive a 95%, while a comment AND a response can earn up a 100%.

See you tomorrow!

Homework: Great Depression Zaption!

Don’t forget you’ve got a reading quiz tomorrow (your very last one!) and your unit vocabulary is also due.  And while I know you’re slammed with work, I also need you to watch the following Zaption on the Great Depression, and respond to the embedded questions.  Remember to sign in and provide your name.  If you run into difficulties, let me know:

The Great Depression: Zaption!

Just a head’s up about tomorrow, guys– first period will only be meeting for an hour, and all of the other classes will be longer than normal, since Math is starting their EOCs.

Bonus Film Reviews: Third Time’s the Charm

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: AP World History on Film assignment by December 16th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all of the films listed below:

Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India, dir. Ashutosh Gowariker (2001)

Paths of Glory, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1957)

A Very Long Engagement [Un long dimanche de fiançailles], dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet (2004)

***NOTE: This film is rated R for violence and sexuality.  If your parent or guardian would object to you viewing this film, please move along to another option.

Modern Times, dir. Charles Chaplin (1936)

***NOTE: This is a silent film.  I know.  You’ll live.

Casablanca, dir. Michael Curtiz (1942)

The Last King of Scotland, dir. Kevin Macdonald (2006)

***NOTE: This film is rated R for language, violence, and sexuality.  If your parent or guardian would object to you viewing this film, please move along to another option.

Happy viewing!

Happy Thanksgiving! (And also, you have some work to do. Sorry.)

Congratulations, guys– you made it to Thanksgiving.  Take some time over the next week to relax, enjoy time with your family and friends, and eat some pies.

However.

We’re getting awfully close to the end of the semester (only three more weeks when we get back!), which means you’ve got some work to complete over the break.  So here’s what you need to do during your break:

  1. Complete the CCOT Worksheet using the prompt from the 2015 AP World History exam.  (For those of you who were absent on Friday, please check your email– I’ll send it to you.  You should also review how to write a Change and Continuity essay by looking at the Essay Writing Materials section of this website.)
  2. Read, annotate, and grade one of the three released student sample essays from the 2015 CCOT essay.  (Again, those of you who were absent, please check your email.)  We’ll talk about how you graded the essays when we get back on Monday, November 30th.
  3. Read for this unit! (Basically: finish the book.  Your reading quiz will be on December 3rd.)
  4. Work on your Content Paper.  It’s due on December 1st.
  5. Start working on the Student Learning Objective Review.  Remember, your Student Learning Objective (SLO) exam will make up 10% of your final grade, and will take place on December 11th.

So that’s what you need to be up to date for the next week.  Take care, have fun, and I’ll see you on the 30th.

 

(And just a reminder– I’m going to be out in the hinterlands starting on Sunday, so I make no guarantees about my availability via email.  If you need to get in contact with me for any reason, I may not respond until Saturday, November 28th.)

Homework: Final Paper Topic Selection!

As we discussed in class today, we’re going to begin working on a final research project which will require you to do a significant about of work with primary sources in order to get a better feel for the historical position of someone involved in a significant event or moment of human history.  You received the handout describing the process we’ll be going through for the rest of the semester, and you should read it carefully.  If you’ve misplaced yours, you can download a new copy here (Final Research Project: Topics and Instructions).  You can also find a full description of the project on the Talking About History: Final Research Project page on this website.

(In order to get to the Talking About History page, look at the drop-down menu at the top of this page.  Hover over “AP World History WebQuests and Projects” and you’ll see the page and all of it’s related materials at the bottom of the drop-down menu.  It wouldn’t be a bad idea to peruse all of the pages associated with the assignment in order to get a feel for how this project will progress.)

For homework this weekend you will choose topics you would be interested in selecting for your research project.  I suggest you review the available topics on the instruction sheet and do some quick Googling to see what your options and preferences might be.  You will make your selections via a Google form which you can access on the Topic Selection page.

The Topic Selection form will go live at 12:00 PM EST (noon) on Saturday, October 10th.  You MUST have completed your selections by 8:00 AM EST on Monday, October 8th.

Remember, topics will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.  I want you all doing unique projects, so if you really have your heart set on a particular topic, make sure you fill out the form early!  If you fail to complete the form, I will assign you whatever topics are left.