Bonus Assignment: Film Reviews!

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: AP World History on Film assignment by Friday, March 4th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all most of the films listed (The Lion in Winter‘s trailer is super weird and not all that helpful):

Throne of Blood, dir. Akira Kurosawa (1957)

Spartacus, dir. Stanley Kubric (1960)

Hero, dir. Yimou Zhang (2002)

Henry V, dir. Kenneth Branagh (1989)

The Lion in Winter, dir. Anthony Harvey (1968)— remember, this one is rated PG, but the content is definitely edgy.  Best to clear this one with your parents first.

Some of these you may be able to find online or through instant streaming services, and some you may not.  You may even find it useful to check at your local community library for a few of these– they’re well-regarded films, many of which have won Oscars, so it’s not unlikely that you’d be able to check a DVD out from a library if you can’t find the movie streaming on Netflix.

Happy viewing!

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Unit Two Test Tomorrow!

First things first: there is a county-wide AP World History twitter chat scheduled for tonight starting at 8:00 PM; if you have questions about studying for the AP exam, content relating to this (or any other) unit, the essays, or anything else AP World History-related, please feel free to check out the hashtag #APWORLDCobb starting tonight at 8:00 PM EST.  The primary account is @CobbAPWorldHistory, if you would like to ask a direct question.  I’ll be there along with a number of other AP World teachers from the county to answer any questions you have– you’ll see me on the chat as @GallowayAPWorld.

(A note regarding my social media policy: I do not follow students currently enrolled in high school on any platform.  The above twitter account is for the purpose of these academic chats only, and I will not be using it for anything outside of those concerns.  You’re free to follow that account, but I will not follow you back.  Turn eighteen, graduate, and then we can revisit the issue.)

As to your preparation for tomorrow’s test– remember that cramming does more harm than good, and make sure to go to bed at a decent hour.  If you couldn’t make the study session today after school, remember to check out the Unit Two resources page for the review podcast.  You’ll also find the relevant Crash Course videos and some primary source documents that you might possible see on the test.  We’ll be doing some clean up of Mesoamerica on Monday, so you can expect the test to go easy on the Americas this time around, although I will likely have a question or two in there just to make sure you did the reading.

See you tomorrow!

 

Additional Resources: Roman Republic

Sorry to be publishing this so late in the day, guys– I went to sleep as soon as I got home after leaving school today and only just woke up.  Hopefully the extra sleep will have me feeling more on top of my game tomorrow than I was today.

At any rate, if you were absent today, we watched the following documentary:

and then responded to the following discussion questions:

  • The video quotes Napoleon as saying that “the story of Rome is the story of the world.” To what extent do you agree with this statement? Consider the other civilizations we have studied this unit; do you feel that Napoleon’s statement could be equally applied to the Persian, Indian, and Chinese empires? Why or why not?

  • As a historian living during the Roman empire interested in studying the foundation of Rome, Livi expresses a common idea– that the past was a simpler, more virtuous time which was materially different from the present. In studying the early mythology of early Rome, Livi learns this is DEFINITELY not true. Why do you think people romanticize the past in this way? What purpose does this romanticism serve?

You should also review the following PowerPoint for further information on the subject: Roman Republic

Homework: Zaption and Classical Greece Mindmap

First things first:

Are you registered to take your AP exams for this year?  If you’re not, you’re running out of time to sign up– regular registration will close on January 28th, and then you will have to pay a fifteen dollar late fee to register.  Don’t get hit with a late fee on top of the price of the regular exams– they aren’t cheap, and you should try to get the best deal you can.  ALL registration will close on February 4th, as the school has to send in its order for exams that week.

You can register for ALL of your AP exams by going to the North Cobb High School TotalRegistration portal.  Remember, we don’t take any money for exams at school– all of your payments must be handled through TotalRegistration.

And remember: If you are eligible for federal free or reduced lunch status, PLEASE make sure you pick up the AP exam waiver form from me in class or go to Admin 1 and request one– the waiver can mean that you only have to pay $15 for your exams, instead of the $104 they can cost with the processing fee, so please, please, please take advantage of the resources if they apply to you.  That’s what they’re around for!

As to tonight’s homework:

Hopefully you completed most of your Mindmap of Ancient Greece today in class, but if you didn’t, please make sure you have it completed before the start of class tomorrow.  Remember that your mindmap SHOULD involve color, illustration, or creative organization of some kind.  The more you work with and manipulate the information we address in this course, the more likely you are to be able to successfully recall the material in the future.

(Ask Ms. Shelnutt or Mr. Hargis and your friends in AP Psych if you don’t believe me!)

Your primary homework tonight is to complete the Zaption video on Alexander the Great (?) and Hellenism.  You’ll find the video linked below– I can’t embed Zaptions without a heck of a lot of tedious coding– but if you can’t use the video for some reason, please download the transcript of the video and associated question and complete the assignment on paper: Alexander, Legacies, and Greatness Zaption.

Zaption Video: Alexander, Legacies, and Greatness

Remember: Unit Two Reading Quiz Tomorrow!

No official homework tonight, guys!  (College tour crew: I decided to cut back on the reading from the Vedas, so feel free to skip that.)  Instead, tonight you should review for your reading quiz and make sure you’ve finished your Unit Two vocabulary assignment.  We’ll be taking our reading quiz during the first thirty minutes of class tomorrow– it will be comprised of thirty multiple choice questions (no short answer).

And one other thing: here are the terms for the Thesis Statement Bootcamp Donut Challenge.  For the next three weeks, we’ll be doing a Thesis Statement Bootcamp as often as possible.  At the end of the three weeks, I’ll check the score, and the class with the most valid thesis statements at the end of that period will receive donuts.  At present, here are the scores:

  • First Period: 0
  • Second Period: 1
  • Third Period: 0

We’ll be starting with another thesis statement first thing tomorrow, so make sure you bring your A-game.

 

 

Homework: Decline of Empires

Tonight for your homework, you need to carefully read and annotate the article “Decline and Fall of Empires.”  Once you’ve finished reading the article, please respond to the following discussion points:

Of the nine suggested causes of imperial decline, which do you think would have the most immediate consequences?  Which of the nine causes would have more gradual consequences?  Can you provide any historical examples from China– different from those already included in the article– which illustrate these points? 

What do you think of the author’s suggestion that “otherworldly or escapist religions” can be a cause of imperial collapse?  Why might this be?  Do you agree with this assessment?

In order to earn a maximum grade of 95% on this assignment, you may leave ONE thoughtful comment addressing the above points on this post.  In order to earn 100%, you should leave your original comment AND reply to a comment left by a classmate.

If you are experiencing difficulties leaving a comment, please try the following:

  1. If you can’t see the “Leave a Comment” option, scroll alllllllllllll the way to the bottom of the page and see if you can see a white box.  Sometimes, if you’ve clicked on the blog post itself, you have to scroll to the end of the page to reply.
  2. Use a computer, not your phone.
  3. Check your browser!  WordPress works best on Chrome (Mozilla’s okay, too), but Internet Explorer is not a great idea.  Always try to use the most recent version of your browser– this may mean that you need to update your browser.
  4. Clear your Internet history and cookies.  Try leaving a comment again once you’ve done this.
  5. If you still can’t leave a reply, email your comment to me instead.

And full disclosure, guys– I’m not feeling too well at present, so it may take me a while to authorize your comments tonight.  But I promise I’ll authorize them as soon as I’m able.

Homework: Legalism, Daoism, and Confucianism

For homework tonight, you will need to read two of three Chinese primary sources which you received in class.  You MUST read Legalist Views on Good Government.  You must also read ONE of the following documents: Excerpts from The Analects or Daoism.  There are no questions you need to complete with the documents– we will be using the content from these documents in order to complete an activity tomorrow in class, and you will find it rather difficult to correctly fulfill the requirements without having done the associated reading.  Make sure that you annotate your reading as appropriate and look up terms you don’t understand.

Also, please remember that your Unit Two reading quiz will be on Friday, January 22nd, so you need to be working towards finishing your unit reading as well.  You will have your first in-class comparative essay coming up on Monday, January 25th.

NOTE: If you will be absent over the next several days for the winter College Tour, please make sure that you check your email for the notes you will miss and any instructions on what we’ll be doing during the rest of this week.

Reminders and Resources for Monday

Sorry for the late posting, guys!  I got distracted during my planning period yesterday and totally blanked on posting for the weekend.  Remember, for the first 45 minutes of class on Monday, we’ll be doing another ChalkTalk (conversation on paper), like we did on the topic of civilizations.  The topic this time will be on religions and belief systems in the Classical Age, so make sure you:

  • Finish reading and annotating the three articles on religious diffusion from last week.  You should have one on the Jewish diaspora, one on the spread of Buddhism, and another on the spread of Christianity.  You’ll be able to refer back to the texts during our exercise, so make as many notes as you like.
  • Review your textbook readings on Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Legalism.  I’ll be making comparisons to various belief systems in your prompts, so it’s good to be prepared.
  • Watch the following Crash Course videos to give you a little extra background on Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Christianity.  I’ll also link to various other primary source readings you might find interesting at the underneath the videos, but please know that you are NOT required to read them.  I’m posting them only because I thought you might find them interesting.

Here are some further readings you might be interested in: Excerpts from The Analects (Confucianism), Daoism (writings of Lao Tzu), Hymns from the Rig Veda (Hinduism), Introduction to Buddhism (Buddhism), Judaism and the Law (Judaism), Sermon on the Mount (Christianity).

Additionally, don’t forget that you have your Unit Two test on Tuesday, so there will be an after school study session on Monday, August 31st from 3:40 to 4:40 PM in room 312.

Happy studying!

Classical Greece MindMap and Comparative Essay Practice

Remember, if you didn’t finish your mindmap over Classical Greece today in class, I expect it to be finished this evening for homework.

Additionally, don’t forget to read, annotate, and grade the released student example essay from the 2010 AP World History exam you received in class today.  Pay special attention to the annotated rubric, and try to follow it exactly.  If you’re not sure about the quality of the evidence in the essay, use your textbook to help you fact-check what the student is writing.  Be ready with a grade tomorrow so that we can discuss what earned points and what didn’t– and why.  This will help you immeasurably on your in-class essay on Thursday, so it’s important that you take this assignment seriously.

Homework: The Decline and Fall of Empires

Tonight for your homework, you need to carefully read and annotate the article “The Decline and Fall of Empires.”  Once you’ve finished reading the article, please respond to the following discussion points:

  • Of the nine suggested causes of imperial decline, which do you think would have the most immediate consequences?  Which of the nine causes would have more gradual consequences?  Can you provide any historical examples– different from those already included in the article– which illustrate these points?  
  • What do you think of the author’s suggestion that “otherworldly or escapist religions” can be a cause of imperial collapse?  Why might this be?  Do you agree with this assessment?

In order to earn a maximum grade of 95% on this assignment, you may leave ONE thoughtful comment addressing the above points on this post.  In order to earn 100%, you should leave your original comment AND reply to a comment left by a classmate.

If you are experiencing difficulties leaving a comment, please try the following:

  1. If you can’t see the “Leave a Comment” option, scroll alllllllllllll the way to the bottom of the page and see if you can see a white box.  Sometimes, if you’ve clicked on the blog post itself, you have to scroll to the end of the page to reply.
  2. Use a computer, not your phone.
  3. Check your browser!  WordPress works best on Chrome (Mozilla’s okay, too), but Internet Explorer is not a great idea.  Always try to use the most recent version of your browser– this may mean that you need to update your browser.
  4. Clear your Internet history and cookies.  Try leaving a comment again once you’ve done this.
  5. If you still can’t leave a reply, email your comment to me instead.

Sub-Saharan African Societies: Axum, Meroe, the Niger River region, and Bantu Migrations.

We’re going to do some experimental work today, guys, so be prepared to be patient if the technology we’re using gives us fits– it’s always worth playing around with new ways of collaborating and sharing information, even if there are some hiccups.  Here’s what’s going to happen:

  1. You’re going to be divided up into groups, each of which will be responsible for researching the history of one region of African history during the period 600 BCE to 600 CE.
  2. You will use all available resources (textbooks, JSTOR, Google Scholar, etc.) to generate a detailed, annotated, interactive, and ACCURATE digital timeline of your region during the period 600 BCE to 600 CE.  You will be working on this timeline not only with the people in your group, but with ALL of the groups in ALL of my classes.  Your timeline should include information on the political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and artistic (PERSIA) history of your region.  You will CITE your sources that you use.
  3. You will find additional media (Flickr or other Creative Commons images, YouTube or Vimeo videos, Soundcloud audio, Google maps, etc.) to support your information.  You will correctly attribute this media in the Google spreadsheet template.
  4. You will use the shared Google spreadsheet link I have emailed to you in order to add your information to the template.  The template will automatically update.  DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING THAT IS DISPLAYED IN RED.
  5. Make sure to read over the material other groups have generated before you add anything new! You don’t want to repeat information.

In order to access the Google template, please check the email address you provided me at the beginning of the semester.  I should have shared the appropriate link with each of you.  (Really, only one person in each group needs to enter the information you generate as you work, so only one person will need to access this link.)  If you need to, you can use the emailed link to access the template at home and add more information after class.

IMPORTANT NOTE: When entering BCE dates, please indicate them in the spreadsheet by adding a minus sign before each.  (Thus, 600 BCE becomes -600, and 555 CE is simply 555.)

Here are the timelines for each region.  Remember, they’re automatically updated, so as soon as you type anything into the spreadsheet, it will show up online:

Your homework tonight will be to examine each of the above timelines, and to comment on this post with (a) the most interesting thing you learned from each timeline, and (b) one good observation about sub-Saharan culture or history between the years 600 BCE and 600 CE.