Homework: Comparative Essay Prep

I hope you all have a relaxing, slightly extended weekend!  Please make sure to be careful if you’re out traveling about on Saturday; while I sincerely doubt we’ll be snowed in, there’s enough water on the roads to make life exciting (in a bad way) overnight.  So– be careful out there, okay?

Now.  Over the weekend, you will need to do some work to prepare for your first in-class comparative essay.  You’ll need this: Imperial Collapse Comparative Prompt

You may ONLY use the space below the line to write your outline, which you may use to help you write your essay on Monday.  You MUST hand-write your outline– no typing allowed, and you may not use the back of the paper.

Use your notes, use your reading on the collapse of empires, and use your textbooks.  I would STRONGLY SUGGEST that you stay away from using Internet sources unless you are absolutely confident in their accuracy.

Also: a number of you were absent today.  Please remember that unless your absence is excused, you are not eligible to make up the reading quiz you missed today.

Homework: Zaption on 20th Century Peace Movments

We’ve been all about war this unit, and that can’t be healthy.  So please watch the following Zaption and answer the associated questions.  If you have tech difficulties with this Zaption, please try to let me know by about 6:00 PM tonight.

Zaption: Peace Movements in the 20th Century

And  because we were discussing this in third period today, take a gander at the Chinese government’s recent video proposing their new, awesome, Five Year Plan!  (Yes.  Yes, they still have Five Year Plans.  And this video is INSANE.)

Homework: Women, Purity, and Sati in the Mughal Empire.

Tonight for homework, please read and annotate the secondary and primary source you received in class today (Women and Sati in Mughal India).  After reading and analyzing the text, please respond to the following discussion points:

Why was sati more prevalent in high-caste communities?  What were the social and religious justifications for sati?

Consider the primary source you have regarding sati.  What limitations does it have as a source?  Do you think an Indian source would have the same limitations, or would there be other issues to consider when evaluating a similar type of source?

Do you think a female author would have approached the discussion of sati in the same way as a male author?  Why or why not?  Consider the first description of a widow participating in sati in the primary source.  What do you think would have motivated her to carry out this act?  How might she have understood her actions? Can you understand why she might have participated in this act?

Having also read Women in the Ottoman Empire, do you notice any significant similarities in the social role of women in the Gunpowder Empires?

Remember, normal commenting rules apply: one good comment addressing ALL of the discussion points can earn up to 95%, while a comment and response to someone else’s discussion can earn you full credit.

(If you would like a link to the primary source document on the Ottoman empire and gender, please look at the previous entry on this blog. I’ll try to link to it directly in a bit, but for some reason I can’t edit WordPress on my computer right now, and am thus writing this update on my phone, which is less than ideal.)

Nevermind, everything is working now and I’ve gone back and added in the necessary links!

Post-Classical China and Dehydrated Essays

Classwork for Friday, September 11th:

Using your textbook, the Southernization article from yesterday, and the PowerPoint on Post-Classical China, please complete the charts you received in class today on the Sui, Tang, Song, and Yuan dynasties.  (If you have lost the charts, you may download a new copy here: Post-Classical China Charts.)

If you do not finish your work on Post-Classical China today during class, you will need to complete it for homework this weekend, in addition to the assignment below.


Homework for Friday, September 11th:

This weekend, you are to complete the following assignment as practice for your upcoming in-class comparative essay on Wednesday, September 16th.  You should have received your first comparative essay back in class today– please use  it as a guide to help you determine what areas you need to work on for this assignment.

On a six by four inch index card (like the one you got today in class), you will write a “dehydrated essay.”  That is, you will respond to the comparative essay prompt below in an abbreviated form.

On the front of your index card, please write your thesis statement.  Put your name in the bottom right hand corner of the card.  It should look like this:

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On the back of the index card, you will will create a 3 by 3 grid.  Here’s how it should look:

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The first row of the grid will be where you will identify the direct comparisons of similarities and differences which you would address in a full essay.  You need to write your direct comparison as a complete sentence.

The second row of the grid is where you should write three specific pieces of evidence you could use to support each direct comparison.  Bullet points are fine for this part.

The third row of the grid is where you will write an analysis (a statement explaining WHY or HOW a direct comparison exists) of the direct comparison in each column.  This should be a complete sentence.

Your essay prompt is as follows:

Compare and contrast the religious and cultural transformations of the post-Classical age in TWO of the following regions:

  • East Asia
  • Southeast Asia
  • South Asia

You may use your textbook, notes, and all other (academic) sources in order to complete your dehydrated essay.  We will be using these cards on Monday for an activity in class, so PLEASE make sure you have yours completed, or else things will be slightly awkward.

Homework: Classical India Zaption!

All right, guys– the Zaption I had intended to use on the Maurya empire appears to be missing, but that’s okay, as there’s another one on the development of the caste system and the Buddha which is just as important.  So!  Please go to the link below and watch the portion of The Story of India included in the Zaption, and answer all associated questions.  Please send me an email if you have any difficulties with the Zaption, and I’ll help you find an alternate way of completing the assignment.

The Story of India: Caste System and Buddhism

And if you, like me, are fascinated by Indian history and would like to watch the entire episode, you’ll find it embedded below:

Additionally, remember that you need to be working on your unit reading and vocabulary in anticipation of the Unit Two reading quiz on Monday, August 24th.  If you have lost your copy of the Unit Reading Guide and vocabulary assignment, please download another copy from the Unit Two materials page.

See you tomorrow!

Homework: Mandate of Heaven!

Reminder: There will be a study session for the Unit One Test held after school tomorrow (Wednesday, August 12th) in Ms. Galloway’s room from 3:40 until 4:40 PM.


Today we finished up our discussion of the Indus River Valley, and began our discussion on the early Chinese dynasties.  (First period, being terribly efficient, is already finished with China.  Nice job, first period.)  We won’t have time to watch it in class right now, but there is a good Crash Course on the process of dynastic rule and the Mandate of Heaven in China– just ignore ALL of his pronunciation.  It’s horrific:

You DO have homework tonight: please read the Mandate of Heaven document you received in class today, and complete the seven associated questions on a separate sheet of paper.  This will be due at the start of class tomorrow.

Egypt and the Indus River Valley!

No homework tonight, guys!  (Well.  There’s always the unit reading.  And quiz corrections.  And you could probably stand to start reviewing for the Unit One test on Thursday.  But there’s no assigned homework, so that’s something at least.)

Today we finished up talking about ancient Egypt through the Old Kingdom.  If we didn’t get to it in class, you might like to watch the Crash Course episode on this subject as a means of review:

We also began working on identifying the major political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and artistic accomplishments of the Indus River Valley civilization by comparing what various AP World History textbooks have to say on the subject.  We’ll be finishing this up tomorrow, and then moving on to China.

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Remember, if you were absent for the reading quiz on Friday, you need to schedule a make-up with me as quickly as possible.  Everyone else: you have until Monday, August 17th at 4:30 PM to get your quiz corrections completed.

Happy studying, guys!