Homework: World War II and the Holocaust

CHANGE IN PLANS, FOLKS– MAKE SURE TO READ THIS:

Hey, there.  Since our schedule today (and for the next few days) is rather messed up, second period doesn’t have much time in class to work on their infographic, which means they’ll need to focus on that for their homework tonight (5/2).  Thus, I would like you to complete the assignment below by the start of class on WEDNESDAY (5/4), rather than the start of class tomorrow (5/3).  Sorry for the confusion, guys– I wish I’d known about the bell schedule for today in advance, but I didn’t. :/

This evening, please review the following material on the Holocaust (or Shoah) as a continuation of our study of World War II:

World War II and Society

After reviewing the material above, please listen to the following radio broadcast by journalist Edward R. Murrow on the liberation of Buchenwald in April of 1945. You will find that the sound quality is far from perfect– there are lots of hisses and pops and the whine of interference, as this is the actual recording from 1945. If you would like to, you can follow this transcript of the broadcast while you listen– but please do listen. Sometimes the tone of voice is just as important as the words themselves:

Liberation of Buchenwald, 15 April 1945, reported by Edward R. Murrow (CBS News)

In a thoughtful comment, please respond to the following prompts:

  • Describe the events in Germany beginning in 1933 which led to the Final Solution. What was their purpose? How did these actions normalize discrimination?
  • What were the conditions like in Buchenwald when Murrow and the American troops arrive? What sort of men did Murrow encounter in the camp? What do you think shocked Murrow the most about the experience? What shocked you the most about his description?
  • At the end of the broadcast, Murrow tells his audience that “if [he] has offended [them] by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, [he’s] not in the least bit sorry.” What is Murrow’s tone when he delivers this line? (That is, how does he sound?)
  • Murrow, as a journalist, believed that it was his job to make an argument– NOT to be a mere reporter of facts. What argument is he trying to make through this report? What does he want his listeners to feel, learn, and believe as a result of his work? Do you think that he achieved his goal? Why or why not?

Remember, normal commenting rules apply: one thoughtful comment which addresses all of the discussion points thoroughly will receive up to 95%, while you must comment and leave a response on someone else’s comment in order to earn full credit.

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Homework: Narrative of Olaudah Equiano

Tonight, you will read a selection from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, detailing his experiences with the trans-Atlantic slave system.  Please respond to the following prompt on a separate sheet of paper:

In the full narrative of Olaudah Equiano’s experiences with slavery, he describes his personal background and the cultural from which he was taken as a slave.  While the portion of the narrative you have does not directly provide information about Equiano’s background, it does, however, suggest certain things about his culture.  What assumptions might you make about Equiano’s background, based on what he writes in this passage?  (Are there any guesses as to his cultural practices, social norms, taboos, or beliefs which you would feel comfortable making based on what you’ve read?

Consider when and why Equiano wrote his narrative.  To whom does he think he is writing?  Do you think that might have had an effect on WHAT he chose to write?  If so, why?

Please try to provide specific textual references as you answer the above discussion points!

Homework: Tokugawa Edicts!

Tonight, please read the two selections from the Tokugawa Edicts located below:

You will note that there are four questions following each of the passages; please fully answer the questions on a separate sheet of paper.  They will be due at the start of class tomorrow.


 

Additionally, please be aware that you’ve got several things coming due relatively shortly:

  • In-class DBQ (Friday, March 11th)
  • Source Scavenger Hunt (Thursday, March 24th)
  • Black Death DBQ Rewrite (Thursday, March 24th)
  • Renaissance and Reformation WebQuest (Friday, March 18th)
  • Unit Four Test (Friday, March 18th)
  • In-class DBQ (Friday, March 25th)

For your Black Death DBQ rewrite, you will want to use the Black Death DBQ documents.  Remember that you should take the comments you received on your first DBQ to heart, and try to avoid making the same mistakes a second time.

Homework: DBQ Preparation!

Happy Friday, folks!  While I don’t want to rain on your parade, I’m afraid I have to remind you that you have your very first document-based question scheduled for next Monday (February 29th).  We’ll be doing this as a timed essay, so you will not be receiving the prompt in advance– instead, I’m going to ask that you do a different type of preparation in advance of the coming DBQ.

Today in class you should have picked up the annotated rubric for the 2008 released DBQ from the College Board exam, as well as two sample student essays.  (This is the same essay which you outlined for me on Wednesday night.)  You’ll need your DBQ documents out in order to complete this assignment– if you’ve lost them, you can download another copy from the link in the post from Wednesday, February 24th.

Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Carefully read over the annotated rubric.  Make sure you fully understand what you can and can’t give points for before you start reading the essays.
  2. Read and annotate each essay.  You may find it useful to highlight or underline the thesis, POV analysis, additional documents, grouping, and evidence.
  3. Use the rubric to decide on a score, from 1 to 9, for both essays.
  4. Then, on a separate sheet of paper, briefly write an explanation for your score for each essay.  What points did each earn? Why didn’t you give them certain points?  (Bullet points are fine for this.)
  5. Check the class blog on Sunday afternoon.  I will schedule a post to go live at 12:00 PM with the information on how each essay was actually scored.  Compare your score to the official score and write a brief statement explaining why your score differed (if it did) from the official score.
  6. Be prepared to turn in your score analysis sheet at the start of class on Monday!

NOTE: First and second periods, I told you that you would also need to analyze your own DBQ outline and give it a grade– and you’re still welcome to do so!– however, I forgot to give third period back their outlines, so that part of the assignment will not be required. 🙂

Have a good weekend, guys, and I’ll see you on Monday!

Homework: The Question of Mongol Awesomeness.

I know I don’t need to remind you, but: you’ve got an in-class comparative essay tomorrow.  We’ll do it the first 40 minutes of class, so make sure you’re (a) present, and (b) not late.  I would suggest reviewing the following materials:

  • Mongol Documents (from today’s activity)
  • Southernization
  • Your article on the spread of Islam (check the homework for this unit to find it up on this blog)

You could also watch this Crash Course video!

And this one:

You MIGHT find that the topic has something to do with trade. And religions.  So.

Now.  On to today’s homework: after reading the above Mongol documents thoroughly and discussing them in your groups today, please respond to the following prompt on a separate sheet of paper (YOU DO NOT NEED TO DO BLOG COMMENTS THIS TIME):

Were the Mongols a beneficial force for Eurasia during the Post-Classical era?  Why or why not?  Provide five reasons– supported by evidence from your readings– to justify your answer.

Happy mongol-ing, and I’ll see you tomorrow!

 

Homework: Tang and Song Meditations on War

First and foremost: congrats to second period for their victory in our first attempt at Thesis Statement Bootcamp!  We’ll be starting a new round, so if your class didn’t win donuts this time, don’t despair: you can still win a delicious reward by the end of the semester.

As to your homework– you should have picked up the packet of three examples of Tang and Song dynasty poetry, all on the subject of warfare.  As you read each of the poems, think about the historical, cultural, and political context which surrounds each poem.  You’ll need to complete the series of questions which follow each poem on a separate sheet of paper– I want you to hold on to the packet as a whole, and just turn in your answers.

If you have lost your packet, never fear: you can follow the links below to each of the three poems and questions:

Happy reading, and stay warm out there!

Homework: Ibn Battuta in Mali

First things first: remember that if you have not signed up for your AP exams, tonight is your last chance before the deadline.  Please go to the North Cobb TotalRegistration portal in order to sign up now! 

Everybody good?  Good.

As to your homework tonight, please thoroughly read and annotate Ibn Battuta’s account of his travels in Mali– if you’ve lost your copy, you’ll find a digital version on the Unit Three materials page.

Ignore the questions at the bottom of page 64 (I’ve marked through them on your copy)– instead, I want you to focus on the discussion points below.  One point of caution, however: as you respond to these point, you are to avoid using the words ‘bias‘ or ‘biased.’  Those words don’t exist in AP World History.  Find another, more precise way of explaining what you mean.

1. What does Ibn Battuta find admirable about the people of Mali?

2. Many of Ibn Battuta’s concerns regarding Mali involve the freedoms and behaviors of women.  What do Ibn Battuta’s responses suggest about his cultural and social background?  Is Battuta’s reaction surprising, given his personal background?

3. Is Ibn Battuta’s account useful as a source when studying Mali?  What are the problems inherent in using texts written by people who are from outside of the culture about which they are writing?  What are the problems in relying ONLY on sources drawn from within a culture?

Normal commenting rules apply: one good comment that answer the question will receive a maximum of 95%, and a comment to a colleague’s post will result in a maximum of 100%.

We’ll be working heavily on analyzing primary sources over the next several weeks, so you can expect us to spend a good chunk  of time working on reading texts for content, evidence, and perspective.

 

Homework: Legalism, Daoism, and Confucianism

For homework tonight, you will need to read two of three Chinese primary sources which you received in class.  You MUST read Legalist Views on Good Government.  You must also read ONE of the following documents: Excerpts from The Analects or Daoism.  There are no questions you need to complete with the documents– we will be using the content from these documents in order to complete an activity tomorrow in class, and you will find it rather difficult to correctly fulfill the requirements without having done the associated reading.  Make sure that you annotate your reading as appropriate and look up terms you don’t understand.

Also, please remember that your Unit Two reading quiz will be on Friday, January 22nd, so you need to be working towards finishing your unit reading as well.  You will have your first in-class comparative essay coming up on Monday, January 25th.

NOTE: If you will be absent over the next several days for the winter College Tour, please make sure that you check your email for the notes you will miss and any instructions on what we’ll be doing during the rest of this week.

Homework: The Judgments of Hammurabi

This weekend, you’re going to work on your first analysis of a primary source document for this class– an excerpt from the judgments of Hammurabi, a Babylonian king from the 18th century BCE.  After carefully reading through the text provided for you in class (Judgments of Hammurabi), please respond to the prompt at the bottom of this entry in the form of a comment on this blog post.  You’ll find the “Leave a Comment” link right under the title of this entry, next to the date.  Your comment should be thoughtful and refer to at least two specific examples in the text.

In order to encourage you to use this blog as a venue for discussion, here’s how grading for this assignment will work: a response which appropriately answers the discussion question will receive a maximum grade of 95%.  To earn that final 5% of the grade, you must respond (thoughtfully!) to one of the comments left by your classmates.

A few reminders about appropriate online interactions: as this is an academic assignment, I expect your responses to reflect all standard grammatical and mechanical practices.  Remember that tone is sometimes difficult to discern in online communication, so be sure that you express yourself clearly.  If you’re uncomfortable using your full name to post a comment, please just post using your first name and last initial– I’ll know who you are.

Comments are moderated on this blog, which means that I have to approve your first comment before you’ll see it appear.  It’s a quick process– I just have to hit something on my phone, honestly– but I’ll be evaluating Senior Magnet research presentations all day on Saturday, so I’ll only have a chance to moderate your comments during breaks, as it would be rude for me to have my phone out during presentations.  So please don’t panic if you don’t immediately see your comment on the blog– you may need to wait for a bit before I get around to moderating it.

Here’s your discussion prompt:

Consider Hammurabi’s judgments.  Do you think they would have been effective as a law code?  Who were the judgments meant to protect or benefit?  What sort of social distinctions can we see in Hammurabi’s law code?  Did any of the laws or their implications surprise you?  If so, why?

Remember to include at least two specific examples from the text in your response!

Homework: The Holocaust

This weekend, please review the following material on the Holocaust (or Shoah) as a continuation of our study of World War II:

World War II and Society

After reviewing the material above, please listen to the following radio broadcast by journalist Edward R. Murrow on the liberation of Buchenwald in April of 1945.  You will find that the sound quality is far from perfect– there are lots of hisses and pops and the whine of interference, as this is the actual recording from 1945.  If you would like to, you can follow this transcript of the broadcast while you listen– but please do listen.  Sometimes the tone of voice is just as important as the words themselves:

Liberation of Buchenwald, 15 April 1945, reported by Edward R. Murrow (CBS News)

In a thoughtful comment, please respond to the following prompts:

  1. Describe the events in Germany beginning in 1933 which led to the Final Solution.  What was their purpose?  How did these actions normalize discrimination?

  2. What were the conditions like in Buchenwald when Murrow and the American troops arrive?  What sort of men did Murrow encounter in the camp?  What do you think shocked Murrow the most about the experience?  What shocked you the most about his description?

  3. At the end of the broadcast, Murrow tells his audience that “if [he] has offended [them] by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, [he’s] not in the least bit sorry.”  What is Murrow’s tone when he delivers this line?  (That is, how does he sound?)

  4. Murrow, as a journalist, believed that it was his job to make an argument– NOT to be a mere reporter of facts.  What argument is he trying to make through this report?  What does he want his listeners to feel, learn, and believe as a result of his work?  Do you think that he achieved his goal?  Why or why not?

Remember, normal commenting rules apply: one thoughtful comment which addresses all of the discussion points thoroughly will receive up to 95%,  while you must comment and leave a response on someone else’s comment in order to earn full credit.

Try to get some rest this weekend, guys– we’ve got the final push coming up over the next two weeks.  Remember you have your Unit Six test on Thursday (12/10), and your Student Learning Objective exam on Friday (12/11), so let’s get ready to power through.

 

 

Homework: Discussing Fascism

All right, guys– you know the drill.  Today, you need to read Benito Mussolini’s excerpt from The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.  At the end of the excerpt, you’ll see the following questions:

  1. How did Mussolini view democracy, socialism, and pacifism?
  2. Why would Mussolini’s passionate embrace of heroism and violence appeal to so many Italians (and others) in the 1920s?

Respond to the questions in a comment below– and remember that normal commenting rules apply.  One good comment that fully addresses the questions will receive a 95%, while a comment AND a response can earn up a 100%.

See you tomorrow!

Remember, the Source Scavenger Hunt is Due Tomorrow!

And just in case you’re freaking out because JSTOR won’t let you search through North Cobb’s registration, please do the following, per Ms. Wheeler:

  1. Click “Login.”
  2. Under Username, type “NorthCobb” all one word, properly capitalized.
  3. Under Password, type “second” all lowercase.
  4. Click the Login button.
  5. Now, you will notice on the main screen that the access is provided by North Cobb High School; however, you are not a “real” person yet.
  6. Click Login.
  7. Enter your account username and your own password at the Login Screen.
  8. Click Login.
  9. Now, please notice that your name at the Welcome line in the top right.  Also, be sure the box below still says your access is provided by North Cobb.

I hope that helps, and happy researching!

Homework: AP Insight Work and Practice Assessment

For homework tonight, you’ll need to complete the AP Insight work we began today on private economic institutions in the 16th and 17th centuries.  As this is proprietary material, I cannot link you to extra copies of the worksheets if you have lost them– so for your sake, I hope you haven’t.  You may also want to rewatch the Crash Course we saw in class today:

Here’s what you’ll need to turn in tomorrow:

  1. Definitions of the terms charter company, joint-stock corporationand transnational business.
  2. Text analysis of the charter of the Dutch West India Company from 1621.  You should identify ways the charter supports the idea of the Dutch West India Company as a charter company, a joint-stock corporation, and a transnational business.
  3. Log on to the AP Insight assessment window, located at http://mclasshome.com/harbor/studentLogin .  Use the ID and password I provided for you in class today.
  4. Take the short assessment labeled “Period 4. Compare Private Institutions as Tools of Trade Quiz.”

Also!  Don’t forget that we’re meeting in the Media Center tomorrow– and bring your own earbuds or headphones if you want to avoid using the school headphones, which are super stylish and definitely of high audio quality.

Homework: Tokugawa Edicts!

For homework tonight, please read and analyze the two primary source documents distributed in class today: Tokugawa Edicts: Foreigners, and Tokugawa Edicts: Military.  You will need to complete all of the discussion questions for each document, with the exception of question #2 on the edicts addressing foreigners– that question references a document you do not have access to, so you may choose to skip it.

Additionally, for those of you who I will not see in class tomorrow due to our testing schedule for the PSAT, you might like to watch the documentary that third period will be watching: “Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire.”  I’ve embedded it below for those who are interested:

Third period, I’ll see you tomorrow.  Everyone else, I’ll see you on Thursday.  Good luck on your PSAT!

Homework: Final Paper Topic Selection!

As we discussed in class today, we’re going to begin working on a final research project which will require you to do a significant about of work with primary sources in order to get a better feel for the historical position of someone involved in a significant event or moment of human history.  You received the handout describing the process we’ll be going through for the rest of the semester, and you should read it carefully.  If you’ve misplaced yours, you can download a new copy here (Final Research Project: Topics and Instructions).  You can also find a full description of the project on the Talking About History: Final Research Project page on this website.

(In order to get to the Talking About History page, look at the drop-down menu at the top of this page.  Hover over “AP World History WebQuests and Projects” and you’ll see the page and all of it’s related materials at the bottom of the drop-down menu.  It wouldn’t be a bad idea to peruse all of the pages associated with the assignment in order to get a feel for how this project will progress.)

For homework this weekend you will choose topics you would be interested in selecting for your research project.  I suggest you review the available topics on the instruction sheet and do some quick Googling to see what your options and preferences might be.  You will make your selections via a Google form which you can access on the Topic Selection page.

The Topic Selection form will go live at 12:00 PM EST (noon) on Saturday, October 10th.  You MUST have completed your selections by 8:00 AM EST on Monday, October 8th.

Remember, topics will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.  I want you all doing unique projects, so if you really have your heart set on a particular topic, make sure you fill out the form early!  If you fail to complete the form, I will assign you whatever topics are left.