Happy End of the Year!

Congratulations, my intrepid AP World History Warriors!  You’ve made it through, and I’m so proud of you.  I know this class is tough for a lot of you, and you may have struggled.  There may have been some late nights, some tears, and frustration– and that’s okay.

It’s okay– not because it’s any fun to struggle (it’s not, of course it’s not fun)– but because you didn’t stop trying, and that is one of the hardest and most important lessons to learn. This is the thing about high school: it’s not a springboard to the real world.  It is the real world– just a little bit smaller and with some safety nets. The world is full of deadlines, and stress, and rules that can chafe, and people with whom you don’t always get along– but it’s also full of good friends, and cool things to learn, and chances to prove yourself.

After high school, you’re going to run into all sorts of challenges.  You know the sort– money, jobs, education, relationships, family, health– all of it.  And when you hit that stuff (and you will, because we all do, because that is what it means to be human), you have to know how to work through it when you feel yourself struggling.  You’ve got to be willing to keep trying, just like you did in this class– even when it wasn’t fun.

That willingness to keep working on it until you get it right?  That’s resilience.  That’s grit.  It’s not glamorous, or flashy– but it is real, and it will take you so much farther than brilliance of mind or charisma or pessimism or complaint.  So.  If I have one piece of advice for you going forward, it’s this: don’t be afraid of the hard stuff.  The hard stuff’s the stuff worth doing, and redoing, until you get it right.

 

Now.  On a lighter note, Sydney has given me permission to post her own version of someone dealing with the harder parts of life:

And for those of you wondering, I’ll have grades in by 3:30 PM tomorrow.  Try to refrain from obsessively refreshing Synergy, okay?  It’ll all be okay.

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Bonus Film Opportunity!

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: Movies in World History assignment by Friday, April 22nd!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.  Be aware that some of the selections below contain adult material, and that you should make your selections with the approval of your parent or guardian.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all most of the films:

The Young Victoria (2009), dir. Jean-Marc Vallee

Jodhaa Akbar (2008), dir. Ashutosh Gowariker

Last of the Mohicans (1992), dir. Micheal Mann

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003), dir. Peter Weir

Seven Samurai (1954), dir. Akira Kurosawa

Amistad (1997), dir. Steven Speilberg

 Have fun!

Classwork: Latin American Revolutions!

Using the handout you received at the start of class, please analyze the causes, participants, main events, and long-term effects of the Latin American revolutions in Mexico (1810), Spanish South America, and Brazil.  Your textbooks and the material below should help you to evaluate each revolutions– and don’t forget to note how well you think each revolution represents the ideals of the Enlightenment!

Latin American Revolutions PowerPoint

Also, the always-excellent Freeman-pedia has a really useful page on this subject: Latin American Independence!  I strongly suggest you check it out.

You should be ready to hand in your worksheet tomorrow at the start of class– I will (very quickly!) check it for completion and major errors, and will return it to you so that you can study from it as we get closer to the Unit Five Test.

Bonus Assignment: Film Reviews!

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: AP World History on Film assignment by Friday, March 4th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all most of the films listed (The Lion in Winter‘s trailer is super weird and not all that helpful):

Throne of Blood, dir. Akira Kurosawa (1957)

Spartacus, dir. Stanley Kubric (1960)

Hero, dir. Yimou Zhang (2002)

Henry V, dir. Kenneth Branagh (1989)

The Lion in Winter, dir. Anthony Harvey (1968)— remember, this one is rated PG, but the content is definitely edgy.  Best to clear this one with your parents first.

Some of these you may be able to find online or through instant streaming services, and some you may not.  You may even find it useful to check at your local community library for a few of these– they’re well-regarded films, many of which have won Oscars, so it’s not unlikely that you’d be able to check a DVD out from a library if you can’t find the movie streaming on Netflix.

Happy viewing!

Additional Resources: Roman Republic

Sorry to be publishing this so late in the day, guys– I went to sleep as soon as I got home after leaving school today and only just woke up.  Hopefully the extra sleep will have me feeling more on top of my game tomorrow than I was today.

At any rate, if you were absent today, we watched the following documentary:

and then responded to the following discussion questions:

  • The video quotes Napoleon as saying that “the story of Rome is the story of the world.” To what extent do you agree with this statement? Consider the other civilizations we have studied this unit; do you feel that Napoleon’s statement could be equally applied to the Persian, Indian, and Chinese empires? Why or why not?

  • As a historian living during the Roman empire interested in studying the foundation of Rome, Livi expresses a common idea– that the past was a simpler, more virtuous time which was materially different from the present. In studying the early mythology of early Rome, Livi learns this is DEFINITELY not true. Why do you think people romanticize the past in this way? What purpose does this romanticism serve?

You should also review the following PowerPoint for further information on the subject: Roman Republic

Homework: Zaption and Classical Greece Mindmap

First things first:

Are you registered to take your AP exams for this year?  If you’re not, you’re running out of time to sign up– regular registration will close on January 28th, and then you will have to pay a fifteen dollar late fee to register.  Don’t get hit with a late fee on top of the price of the regular exams– they aren’t cheap, and you should try to get the best deal you can.  ALL registration will close on February 4th, as the school has to send in its order for exams that week.

You can register for ALL of your AP exams by going to the North Cobb High School TotalRegistration portal.  Remember, we don’t take any money for exams at school– all of your payments must be handled through TotalRegistration.

And remember: If you are eligible for federal free or reduced lunch status, PLEASE make sure you pick up the AP exam waiver form from me in class or go to Admin 1 and request one– the waiver can mean that you only have to pay $15 for your exams, instead of the $104 they can cost with the processing fee, so please, please, please take advantage of the resources if they apply to you.  That’s what they’re around for!

As to tonight’s homework:

Hopefully you completed most of your Mindmap of Ancient Greece today in class, but if you didn’t, please make sure you have it completed before the start of class tomorrow.  Remember that your mindmap SHOULD involve color, illustration, or creative organization of some kind.  The more you work with and manipulate the information we address in this course, the more likely you are to be able to successfully recall the material in the future.

(Ask Ms. Shelnutt or Mr. Hargis and your friends in AP Psych if you don’t believe me!)

Your primary homework tonight is to complete the Zaption video on Alexander the Great (?) and Hellenism.  You’ll find the video linked below– I can’t embed Zaptions without a heck of a lot of tedious coding– but if you can’t use the video for some reason, please download the transcript of the video and associated question and complete the assignment on paper: Alexander, Legacies, and Greatness Zaption.

Zaption Video: Alexander, Legacies, and Greatness

Homework: Zaption on 20th Century Peace Movments

We’ve been all about war this unit, and that can’t be healthy.  So please watch the following Zaption and answer the associated questions.  If you have tech difficulties with this Zaption, please try to let me know by about 6:00 PM tonight.

Zaption: Peace Movements in the 20th Century

And  because we were discussing this in third period today, take a gander at the Chinese government’s recent video proposing their new, awesome, Five Year Plan!  (Yes.  Yes, they still have Five Year Plans.  And this video is INSANE.)

Classwork: Major Actions of World War II

Using your textbooks, the following notes, and the video below, work within your groups to create a poster which identifies and describes– through words or relevant images, symbols, maps, or designs– the following aspects of the Second World War:

  • One event you and your group members identify as the starting point of World War II– justify your choice
  • The three most important events from the European (and North African) theater of the war
  • The three most important events from the Pacific theater of the war
  • One event you and your group members identify as the end of World War II — justify your choice
  • One major social consequence of the conflict
  • One major economic consequence of the conflict
  • One major political consequence of the conflict
  • One way in which you think World War II is DIFFERENT from World War I
  • One way in which you thing World War II is SIMILAR from World War I

Make sure your poster is accurate, neat, and colorful!

Notes on the conflict: World War II

Good luck!

Homework: Great Depression Zaption!

Don’t forget you’ve got a reading quiz tomorrow (your very last one!) and your unit vocabulary is also due.  And while I know you’re slammed with work, I also need you to watch the following Zaption on the Great Depression, and respond to the embedded questions.  Remember to sign in and provide your name.  If you run into difficulties, let me know:

The Great Depression: Zaption!

Just a head’s up about tomorrow, guys– first period will only be meeting for an hour, and all of the other classes will be longer than normal, since Math is starting their EOCs.

Bonus Film Reviews: Third Time’s the Charm

Are your essay grades less than desirable?  Do you need to do some grade repair?

Then you need to complete the Real to Reel: AP World History on Film assignment by December 16th!

As we discussed in class, remember that this assignment is NOT a simple bonus assignment– your work needs to be thoughtful, reasoned, and polished, and address all of the requirements described in the assignment sheet above.  Poor quality work will be graded as such.  This is, however, an optional assignment– you are not required to complete this review, and if you choose not to submit one, you will simply be given an exemption.

In order to help you make your selections for this assignment, I humbly present the original trailers to all of the films listed below:

Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India, dir. Ashutosh Gowariker (2001)

Paths of Glory, dir. Stanley Kubrick (1957)

A Very Long Engagement [Un long dimanche de fiançailles], dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet (2004)

***NOTE: This film is rated R for violence and sexuality.  If your parent or guardian would object to you viewing this film, please move along to another option.

Modern Times, dir. Charles Chaplin (1936)

***NOTE: This is a silent film.  I know.  You’ll live.

Casablanca, dir. Michael Curtiz (1942)

The Last King of Scotland, dir. Kevin Macdonald (2006)

***NOTE: This film is rated R for language, violence, and sexuality.  If your parent or guardian would object to you viewing this film, please move along to another option.

Happy viewing!

Latin American Revolutions Homework and Due Dates!

All right, guys– I know it’s been nothin’ but revolutions this week, but you’ve got one more.  Or rather, a series of revolutions.  What you need to do is get out your Latin American Revolution handout from class (or download another copy here: The Age of Revolutions in Latin America), and complete it using the Crash Course video located below, your textbooks, and the notes from this PowerPoint: Latin American Revolutions.


Now, on to due dates.  Big dates coming up that you should keep track of:

  • Annotated Bibliography (Monday, November 9th)
  • Unit Five Reading Quiz (Wednesday, November 11th)
  • Unit Five Vocabulary Assignment (Wednesday, November 11th)
  • In-Class DBQ (Thursday, November 12th)
  • Second Film Review (Friday, November 13th)
  • Industrial Revolution WebQuest Due (Thursday, November 19th)
  • Unit Five Test (Thursday, November 19th)

Additionally, remember that we’ll be in the Media Center tomorrow for a WebQuest, and I’ll be absent on Tuesday of next week for Model UN.  (You’ll have a lot of work in my absence, so try not to get too excited.)  Also, I’ll be teaching you how to write the third and final type of essay for this course on the 20th, so if you know you’re going to be absent that day in advance of Thanksgiving break, please let me know so that we can make arrangements.

Homework: Renaissance and Reformation WebQuest!

Today we began working on the Renaissance and Reformation WebQuest.  If you were absent today you’ll need to start here: Renaissance and Reformation WebQuest: Tasks.  Download the Renaissance and Reformation WebQuest Student Packet, print it out, and use to it work through the WebQuest in order.

We’ll  be back in the Media Center tomorrow, so remember to bring back your headphones or earbuds!

So, guys– you don’t have official-official homework today, but the more work you can get done tonight, the more free time you’ll have in class to work on finding your sources for you final paper.

Homework: Tokugawa Edicts!

For homework tonight, please read and analyze the two primary source documents distributed in class today: Tokugawa Edicts: Foreigners, and Tokugawa Edicts: Military.  You will need to complete all of the discussion questions for each document, with the exception of question #2 on the edicts addressing foreigners– that question references a document you do not have access to, so you may choose to skip it.

Additionally, for those of you who I will not see in class tomorrow due to our testing schedule for the PSAT, you might like to watch the documentary that third period will be watching: “Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire.”  I’ve embedded it below for those who are interested:

Third period, I’ll see you tomorrow.  Everyone else, I’ll see you on Thursday.  Good luck on your PSAT!